The Église de la Chapelle (French) or Kapellekerk (Dutch) is a Roman Catholic church founded in 1134 by Godfrey I of Leuven near what were then the town ramparts. The present structure dates from the 13th century. Part of the structure was damaged by the French during the bombardment of Brussels in 1695 as part of the War of the Grand Alliance. It was restored in 1866 and again in 1989. It contains work by Jerôme Duquesnoy and Lucas Faydherbe.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder was buried in this church. The funeral monument erected by his sons in his honour is still in place. Part of the relics of Saint Boniface of Brussels, Bishop of Lausanne, are also buried here.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jad Boulos (14 months ago)
Very beautiful gothic architecture
Papai Ama Antonio (15 months ago)
Brussels I love you
erik vdbroeck (15 months ago)
near Highstreet and Sablon antiques and restaurants
Aleksandra Stadniczenko (2 years ago)
OPENING HOURS BELOW Very beautiful church (don't mistake it with the Cathedra of St Michael and Gudula). opening hours: Monday/Wednesday/Thursday/Friday/Saturday 10-16:00 (Tuesdays- closed) Holy Masses (in Polish) Sundays 8:00/9:30/11:00/17:30 Adoration of the Holy Sacrament between the Masses: 9-9:30, 10:30-11:00, 17-17:30.
BradJill Travels (2 years ago)
Notre Dame de la Chapelle (free entry) is one of several large Gothic style churches that can visited around the city centre of Brussels. It is located at Place de la Chapelle, a 6-7 minute walk south of the Grote Markt and is open for visitation from 10am to 6pm daily. The church history dates back to the 12th century when its location was outside the the city walls. Originally Romanesque in style, the church was given its predominately Barbantine Gothic architecture in the 15th century. In addition to the attractive Gothic features, there is a nice Baroque style bell tower that was added after the French bombardment in 1695. Fans of fine art will find an interesting statue of Pieter Brueghel the Elder outside Notre Dame de la Chapelle, you can also see a memorial plaque to the Flemish Old Master in one of the right hand side chapels inside the church as well. The interior of the church is quite similar to nearby Notre Dame du Sablon in scale and appearance. There seem to be more fresco paintings but less stained-glass windows here. We particularly enjoyed the ornately carved wooden pulpit amongst other interesting things to see within the church. Overall, Notre Dame de la Chapelle is another good church visit in Brussels for anyone with an appreciation or interest in historic buildings, architecture and history. Its worth 15-20 minutes at least enjoying the interior and exterior of the church.
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