St Aubin's Cathedral

Namur, Belgium

St Aubin's Cathedral (1751-1767) is the only cathedral in Belgium built in academic Late Baroque style. It was the only church built in the Low Countries as a cathedral after 1559, when most of the dioceses of the Netherlands were reorganized.

In the interior, there is an ornamented frieze, carved with swags of fruit and flowers between the Corinthian capitals runs in an unbroken band entirely round the church. All colour is avoided, replaced by architectural enrichments and the bas-reliefs in the pendentives of the dome. The interior contains some pieces of art, like paintings by Anthony van Dyck, Jacob Jordaens and Jacques Nicolaï, a Jesuit brother and student of Rubens. The is also an old, romanesque baptismal font.

In the cathedral a marble plaque near the high altar conceals a casket containing the heart of Don Juan of Austria, Habsburg governor of the Spanish Netherlands, who died in 1578; his body lies in the Escorial near Madrid.

Despite being in Belgium, the cathedral design has an Italian influence; it was built to designs of the Ticinese architect Gaetano Matteo Pisoni in 1751 and 1767. A tower of the former Romanesque church dated from the 13th century that stood on the site has survived and is located at the west end of the church.

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Details

Founded: 1751-1767
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.cana.be

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pharindra Pathak (6 months ago)
Nice place to enjoy city
ncku16howard (8 months ago)
Strong contrast between outside appearance and inner decoration.
bert vdbroeck (9 months ago)
not much artsy things except for the beautiful woodcrafted pulpit
Antonio PALAZZO (14 months ago)
Magnificent church
Antonio PALAZZO (14 months ago)
Magnificent church
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