St Aubin's Cathedral

Namur, Belgium

St Aubin's Cathedral (1751-1767) is the only cathedral in Belgium built in academic Late Baroque style. It was the only church built in the Low Countries as a cathedral after 1559, when most of the dioceses of the Netherlands were reorganized.

In the interior, there is an ornamented frieze, carved with swags of fruit and flowers between the Corinthian capitals runs in an unbroken band entirely round the church. All colour is avoided, replaced by architectural enrichments and the bas-reliefs in the pendentives of the dome. The interior contains some pieces of art, like paintings by Anthony van Dyck, Jacob Jordaens and Jacques Nicolaï, a Jesuit brother and student of Rubens. The is also an old, romanesque baptismal font.

In the cathedral a marble plaque near the high altar conceals a casket containing the heart of Don Juan of Austria, Habsburg governor of the Spanish Netherlands, who died in 1578; his body lies in the Escorial near Madrid.

Despite being in Belgium, the cathedral design has an Italian influence; it was built to designs of the Ticinese architect Gaetano Matteo Pisoni in 1751 and 1767. A tower of the former Romanesque church dated from the 13th century that stood on the site has survived and is located at the west end of the church.

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Details

Founded: 1751-1767
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.cana.be

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Benja Neto (27 days ago)
Muito bonita! Vale a visita!
Riet Lenaert (2 months ago)
De Sint-Albinuskathedraal dateert uit de 18e eeuw, en is gebouwd op de resten van de kerk die er al in de 13e eeuw stond. De voorgevel heeft 8 verhoogd opgestelde Korintische zuilen.
Sam D'Joos (2 months ago)
Grote sobere kerk
Dominique et Béatrice Lestienne (3 months ago)
Magnifique spectacle Les Nocturnales à l'occasion de Noël !
Vojtěch Kika (8 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral where one can walk directly to the alter.
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