Cathedral of St. Michael and St. Gudula

Brussels, Belgium

The Cathedral of St. Michael and St. Gudula has been since 1962 the co-cathedral of the Archdiocese of Mechelen-Brussels, together with St. Rumbold's Cathedral in Mechelen.

A chapel dedicated to St. Michael was probably built on the Treurenberg hill as early as the 9th century. In the 11th century it was replaced by a Romanesque church. In 1047, Lambert II, Count of Leuven founded a chapter in this church and organized the transportation of the relics of the martyr St. Gudula, housed before then in Saint Gaugericus Church on Saint-Géry Island. The patron saints of the church, St. Michael and St. Gudula, are also the patron saints of the city of Brussels.

In the 13th century, Henry I, Duke of Brabant ordered two round towers to be added to the church. Henry II, Duke of Brabant instructed the building of a Gothic collegiate church in 1226. The choir was constructed between 1226 and 1276. It took about 300 years to complete the entire church. It was completed just before the reign of the emperor Charles V commenced in 1519.

The cathedral is built of stone from the Gobertange quarry. The western façade with its three portals surmounted by gables and two towers are typical of the French Gothic style, but without rose window, which was replaced by a large window in the Brabantian Gothic style. The two towers, the upper parts of which are arranged in terraces, are attributed to the Flemish architect Jan Van Ruysbroeck (1470-1485), who also designed the tower of the Town Hall of Brussels. The south tower contains a 49-bell carillon by the Royal Eijsbouts bell foundry on which Sunday concerts are often given. The Salvator bell was cast by Peter van den Gheyn.

The choir is gothic and contains the mausoleums of the Dukes of Brabant and Archduke Ernest of Austria made by Robert Colyn de Nole in the 17th century. Left of the choir is the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament of the Miracle (1534-1539) built in a flamboyant Gothic style. It now houses the Treasure of the Cathedral. Right of the choir is the Chapel of Our Lady of Deliverance (1649-1655) which is built in a late Gothic style and has a Baroque altar by Jan Voorspoel (1666). Behind the choir is a Baroque chapel dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen dated 1675 and a marble and alabaster altarpiece depicting the Passion of Christ by Jean Mone dated 1538.

The nave has all the characteristics of the Brabantine Gothic style: the four-part vaults are moderately high and the robust cylindrical columns that line the central aisle of the nave are topped with capitals in the form of cabbage leaves. Statues of the 12 apostles are attached to the columns. These statues date from the 17th century and were created by sculptors Lucas Faydherbe, Jerôme Duquesnoy the Younger, Johannes van Mildert and Tobias de Lelis, all renowned sculptors of their time. The statues replaced those destroyed by iconoclasts in 1566.

The nave has a Baroque pulpit from the 17th century, made by Antwerp sculptor Hendrik Frans Verbruggen in 1699.

The northern and southern transepts have a stained-glass window by Jean Haeck from Antwerp made in 1537 after drawings by Bernard van Orley. To the right of the portal of the northern transept is an elegant 17th century sculptured depicting The education of the Holy Virgin by Saint Anna by Jerôme Duquesnoy the Younger after a painting by Rubens.

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Details

Founded: c. 1047
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MOHAMMED ALSHARHAN (7 months ago)
Very nice church. It is huge, has a lot things to see inside like sculptures and a lot of stained glass windows. Suggest to visit it on Saturday because you can even listen to organ play during service. There is machine where you can pay 2€ in coins and get souvenir coin with the image of the cathedral.
Max Bodak (9 months ago)
Very nice church. It is huge, has a lot things to see inside like sculptures and a lot of stained glass windows. Suggest to visit it on Saturday because you can even listen to organ play during service. There is machine where you can pay 2€ in coins and get souvenir coin with the image of the cathedral.
Thimira Sankalpa Thilakarathne (9 months ago)
It’s very beautiful and big Gothic Architectural cathedral in Brussels you can visit while you are around Brussels, Belgium. It’s a Roman Catholic Church which was given cathedral status in 1962. Also it’s a very important landmark in Brussels for visitors.
Nicole Cullen (10 months ago)
A very large church with many beautiful paintings. The stained glass is magnificent and all of the place. The church is located in a different type of spot which makes it unique. It’s a good representation of a Belgian style church to compare to other styles.
Balachandran Chandran (10 months ago)
Amazing!! The stained glass window is the highlight. Must appreciate the architectural marvel which was designed in the early 1519. This place has so much to offer to see. You may want to spend more time here if you are an art lover. I personally enjoyed my time out here discovering this wonderful monument.
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