The Hôtel Solvay is a large Art Nouveau town house designed by Victor Horta on the Avenue Louise in Brussels. The house was commissioned by Armand Solvay, the son of the wealthy Belgian chemist and industrialist Ernest Solvay. For this wealthy patron Horta could spend a fortune on precious materials and expensive details. Horta designed every single detail; furniture, carpets, light fittings, tableware and even the door bell. He used expensive materials such as marble, onyx, bronze, tropic woods etc. For the decoration of the staircase Horta cooperated with the Belgian pointillist painter Théo van Rysselberghe. The Hôtel Solvay and most of its splendid content remained intact thanks to the Wittamer family. They acquired the house in the 1950s and did the utmost to preserve and restore this magnificent dwelling. The house is still private property and can only be visited by appointment and under very strict conditions. The edifice is on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The UNESCO commission recognized the Hôtel Solvay as UNESCO World Heritage in 2000 as one of the Major Town Houses of the Architect Victor Horta.

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Founded: 1898
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Geert Loosveld (15 months ago)
Absolute art nouveau icon end 19th century by Victor Horta - very hard and expensive to visit & only in an organized context
Mihai Muresan (2 years ago)
A piece of history
Peter Clericuzio (2 years ago)
House of super-rich industrialist Armand Solvay, inventor and developer of soda chemicals, designed by Victor Horta, master of Art Nouveau architects in Belgium, one of his early designs in the style. Total work of art inside and out, with no expense spared. Usually the interior is closed to the public, but certain days during the year there are tours, coincident with those of other Art Nouveau buildings in Brussels. Located on grand Haussmanian tree-lined avenue, the façade is not to be missed on any tour of Art Nouveau or architecture in the Belgian capital.
Steven Hong (2 years ago)
Great building, too bad can't visit the inside.
Carolyn Lee (3 years ago)
Impressive. For art Nouveau lovers
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