Bauhaus University

Weimar, Germany

Between 1919 and 1933, the Bauhaus School, based first in Weimar and then in Dessau, revolutionised architectural and aesthetic concepts and practices. The buildings created and decorated by the school's professors (Henry van de Velde, Walter Gropius, Hannes Meyer, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and Wassily Kandinsky) launched the Modern Movement, which shaped much of the architecture of the 20th century and beyond.

The main building of the Bauhaus university in Weimar was built between 1904 and 1911 based on plans by Henry van de Velde. As one of the most influential art academies of the early 20th century, this is where the Bauhaus movement was founded in 1919. Today, the building is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Under the supervision of architect Thomas van den Valentyn, the building was completely renovated and almost fully restored to its original condition in 1999.

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Founded: 1904
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Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

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User Reviews

Florian Ehrhardt (3 years ago)
Modern
Laura C NO (3 years ago)
Weimar & Bauhaus: it is a must. Going inside the school you feel a strange sensation...to know more about buildings and how to personalize them. There's a gallery dedicated to 'main Bauhaus founders' very interesting. Free entrance.
Deni Marr (4 years ago)
The palace is a great example of Bauhaus! I just can say it... I dont know about how is the educational program or the academics.
Michael Turtle (7 years ago)
The best examples of the Bauhaus movement are in the city of Dessau but these buildings at the university in Weimar show the progression of the style from the beginning.
Decuypere Walter (8 years ago)
Two buildings by Belgian star architect Henry van de Velde. Architectural highlights. Ask to see the reconstruction of the Walter Gropius Room. Admire the murals by Oskar Schlemmer.
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