St. Peter and Paul Church

Weimar, Germany

The church St. Peter und Paul in Weimar, also known as Herderkirche after Johann Gottfried Herder, is the most important church building of the town. The first church was built on the same location from 1245 to 1249, but destroyed by fire in 1299. Only the foundations remain. The second building was badly damaged in the 1424 town fire. The present building dates back to the a hall church in late Gothic style, built between 1498 and 1500. The choir served as the burial place of members of nobility of the House of Wettin in the Ernestine duchies. The church has been Lutheran since 1525, and Martin Luther gave sermons there.

Towards the end of the Second World War, the church was severely damaged by bombing on 9 February 1945. The pitched roof and the wooden vaults were largely destroyed, the remaining stone vaults in the eastern portions collapsed. The entire interior was badly affected. The church was opened again after reconstruction on 14 June 1953. The repair and restoration of the interior was performed until 1977. The church is part of the World Heritage Site Classical Weimar, together with eleven other sites.

Not much is left of the original Gothic interior, the baptismal font, the stairs to the pulpit and parts of a mural of St. Ursula. The remarkable triptych image of the city was begun by Lucas Cranach the Elder in 1552/53, shortly before his death, and completed in 1555 by his son Lucas Cranach the Younger. It is regarded as a major work of art of the 16th century in Saxony and Thuringia.

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Address

Herderplatz 10, Weimar, Germany
See all sites in Weimar

Details

Founded: 1498-1500
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Clement Deng (8 months ago)
Beautiful
Wolfgang Rost (12 months ago)
Schönste Kirche in Weimar. Vor ein paar Jahren aufwändig renoviert, macht sie heute ein schönes Bild. Der Platz davor ist auch sehr schön. Hier finden ab und zu Märkte oder andere Veranstaltungen statt. Drinnen ist es sehr schön.
Ernie Geefay (13 months ago)
The Late Gothic Town Church of St Peter and Paul was built as a three-nave hall church between 1498 and 1500. The first church was built on this site in 1245-49. The foundations of the west tower are among the oldest building sections in the town. Of the Late Gothic church fittings, there remain the christening font, the steps to the pulpit - which was converted to Baroque style - and parts of a wall painting of Saint Ursula under the organ gallery.   The main attraction is the winged altar which was begun in 1552 by Lucas Cranach the Elder and completed by his son. Of interest is also the Luther Shrine, a triptych dating from 1572, which shows Martin Luther as a monk, as Squire George and as a teacher. Martin Luther often preached in this church, Johann Sebastian Bach often played here and two of his sons were christened here. Between 1776-1803, Johann Gottfried Herder was the senior court preacher, senior consistorial counsellor, general superintendent and vicar at the Town Church and the people of Weimar also call the church the "Herder Church" after him.
Laura C NO (20 months ago)
Nice historic church. Here it is so famous for the tomb of the beloved Johann Gottfried von Herder. He was a German philosopher, theologian, poet, and literary critic. The inhabitants call this place Herderkirche.
Golsa Na (2 years ago)
beautiful place to visit, specially because weimar is small and you can walk through most parts of the city, totally recommend it
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