Schloss Weimar

Weimar, Germany

Schloss Weimar was the residence of the dukes of Saxe-Weimar and Eisenach, and has also been called Residenzschloss. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site 'Classical Weimar'.

In history, the palace was often destroyed by fire. The Baroque palace from the 17th century, with the church Schlosskirche where several works by Johann Sebastian Bach were premiered, was replaced by a Neoclassical structure after a fire in 1774. Four rooms were dedicated to the memory of poets who worked in Weimar, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Gottfried Herder, Friedrich Schiller and Christoph Martin Wieland. From 1923, the building has housed the Schlossmuseum, a museum with a focus on paintings of the 15th and 16th centuries and works of art related to Weimar, a cultural centre.

The building has been developed over the past 500 years. The first building on the site was a medieval moated castle, which was first documented at the end of the 10th century. After a fire in 1424, and again from the mid-16th century, when Weimar became the permanent residence of the dukes, it was remodelled. After another fire in 1618, reconstruction began in 1619 planned by the Italian architect Giovanni Bonalino. The church was completed in 1630, where several works by Johann Sebastian Bach were premiered between 1708 and 1717. Johann Moritz Richter changed the design to a symmetrical Baroque structure with three wings, open to the south.

The building was destroyed by fire in 1774. Duke Carl August formed a commission for its reconstruction directed by Johann Wolfgang Goethe. Architects Johann August Arens, Nikolaus Friedrich Thouret and Heinrich Gentz kept the former walls of the east and north wings and created a 'classical' interior, especially the staircase and the banqueting hall. Decoration was supplied by sculptor Christian Friedrich Tieck. In 1816, Clemens Wenzeslaus Coudray began plans for the west wing, which was reopened in 1847 with a court chapel. The wing contained the so-called Dichterzimmer (poets' rooms), initiated by Duchess Maria Pavlovna. They commemorate Christoph Martin Wieland, Johann Gottfried Herder, Friedrich Schiller and Goethe. From 1912 to 1914 a south wing was added under Duke Wilhelm Ernst.

The Herder Room was restored in 2005, the restoration of the Goethe Room and the Wieland Room was completed in 2014.

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Address

Burgplatz 4, Weimar, Germany
See all sites in Weimar

Details

Founded: 1619
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A C (8 months ago)
Very nice rooms, great decoration, friendly owners, good room prices.
Gerd Kusmagk (11 months ago)
Friendly staff. Abundant breakfast staff and clean room. Definitely to be recommended.
Florina Hamburg (12 months ago)
Incredible! Wanted to book by phone. When I received the offer by email, it was 37 euros more expensive than via a booking portal. I mentioned this. After the phone call was finished, the room on booking.com had been removed so that I could no longer book. I'm speechless. No recommendation!
Asgeir Asgeirsson (3 years ago)
Nice place and very friendly and helpfull staff.
Romy Wand (5 years ago)
Wir wurden freundlich empfangen und hatten die Auswahl zwischen 2 Apartments, die uns persönlich gezeigt wurden. Die Zimmer waren sauber, die Lage der Pension ist gut. Ein kleiner Balkon war günstig für uns Raucher. Wir waren zufrieden.
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