Bouchout Castle

Meise, Belgium

Bouchout Castle is located in the Flemish town of Meise. In the 12th century, this territory of the young Duchy of Brabant was strategically positioned between the County of Flanders and the Berthout family, lords of Grimbergen. Most likely, the first fortification was built by Wouter van Craaynem at the end of the Grimbergen Wars (1150–1170).

At about 1300, the Donjon tower of Bouchout Castle was erected by Daniel van Bouchout, a knight who fought gloriously at the Battle of Worringen. In the 15th and 16th century, Bouchout Castle was owned by the Van der Marck and Transylvan families. The castle fell into disrepair due to lack of maintenance, while the Spanish dominance and the iconoclastic fury further worsened its condition.

The first major renovation was performed by Christoffel d"Assonville at about 1600. The rectangular medieval Bouchout Castle was surrounded by a large pond and could only be reached by a long drawbridge. At the end of the 17th century, Peter-Ferdinand Roose transformed the castle into a Renaissance 'Chateau de Bouchout', surrounded with French ornamental gardens. Unfortunately, the castle was partly destroyed during the French Revolution period (1800–1830). Again, the castle was restored in 1832 by count Amadeus de Beauffort, who gave Bouchout Castle its current Neo-Gothic appearance.

From 1879 until 1927, Empress Charlotte of Mexico lived at the Bouchout Domain. Her husband Emperor Maximilian I was executed by Mexican republicans in 1867. Thereafter Charlotte lead a secluded life at Bouchout Castle. Since 1939, the Bouchout Domain has developed into the National Botanic Garden of Belgium. Since the last renovation of 1987–1989, the castle and its rooms are now being used for meetings, lectures and exhibitions.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Meise, Belgium
See all sites in Meise

Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elizabeth Edmondson (4 years ago)
Nice chateau within the botanical gardens. Very well preserved.
Marcos Peláez Encinas (4 years ago)
Pretty cool site for a day of relax
Magda Babska (4 years ago)
Isolated and magical place. A beautiful castle, a botanical garden and a huge park for walking and an orangery with tasty food.
Luc Trigaux (4 years ago)
A beautiful place to go out to. We walked about 7km in and around the very nice botanical garden and park, and had lunh for a reasonable price, but missed the buffet. We visited the exhibition inside the castle. Not so interesting. We made some nice pictures a beautiful flowers. There were many families with children there because it was a special weekend. On one side of the castle were certainly a hundred of cardboard tents or more, being decorated by the children and they parents. There were animations and activities all around. I loved the greenhouses and all the information that is given in them. There were also guided tours. And even a couple shooting their wedding album there. It was my first time there, although I only live a few kilometres away. I will certainly go again, many times in the future. The entry fee is normally 7 eur for adults but as a teacher, I did not have to pay. Cool.
Nico Basch (4 years ago)
Beautifull. Spent a great day. Enjoyed it.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.