Rupelmonde Castle Ruins

Rupelmonde, Belgium

Rupelmonde Castle was built by the Counts of Flanders in the 12th century directly opposite the mouth of the river Rupel into the Scheldt river to defend these rivers. It was a large fortress with 17 towers circled by a moat. From this castle toll was levied from passing ships. Later on the castle was also used as a state prison. This caused the castle to play a important role in the history of the region.

In 1678, when Spanish and Dutch troops were fighting against French troops, the castle was destroyed. The castle was never rebuilt and turned into a quarry for cheap building materials for the locals. In 1817 the castle ruins were demolished with exception of a base of a tower with some connecting wall fragments. On these remains then a tower out of red Tournai limestone was built by Baron De Feltz. This tower was used as a hunting pavilion.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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