St. Nicholas Church

Valletta, Malta

The Church of St Nicholas is a Greek Catholic church in Valletta. It was originally built to serve as a Greek Orthodox church in 1569. Following the Union of Brest in 1595-96 the Greek Catholic Church came into existence. It was in 1639 that the then parish priest decided to separate from the Orthodox church and join the Greek Catholic Church.

Some time later it was decided to rebuild the church to the design of the Italian architect Francesco Buonamici. The church was rebuilt on the ground plan of a Greek cross in 1652. It has a dome over the crossing supported by four free-standing columns, and a choir in the apse. On September 17, 1766, the parish church and the Confraternity of the Holy Souls signed a concordat that regulates their relations.

The church suffered considerable damage during World War II; it was repaired by the year 1951.

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Details

Founded: 1595/1652
Category: Religious sites in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto Sposito (3 years ago)
Originally a Catholic Church, now a Greek Orthodox Church in the heart of Valletta.
Uros Medic (5 years ago)
Beautiful church for breathtaking pictures?
risto gorancic (5 years ago)
Beautiful
Md Ajijjiga (6 years ago)
Nice
Marko Ignjatovic (6 years ago)
One of few orthodox Church's on Malta
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