Manoel Theatre

Valletta, Malta

The Manoel Theatre is one of the oldest working theatres in Europe. Constructed in 1731 by the Grand Master Antonio Manoel de Vilhena the theatre is a baroque gem with a wonderful acoustic and a full calendar of events populated by local and international performers, with productions in English and Maltese.

The theatre is located on Old Theatre Street in Valletta. It considers itself as the country's national theatre and the home of Malta Philharmonic Orchestra. Originally called the Teatro Pubblico, its name was changed to Teatro Reale, or Theatre Royal, in 1812, and renamed Manoel Theatre in 1866. The first play to be performed was Maffei's Merope. The theatre is a small, 623 seat venue, with an oval-shaped auditorium, three tiers of boxes constructed entirely of wood, decorated with gold leaf, and a pale blue trompe-l'oeil ceiling that resembles a round cupola.

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Founded: 1731
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Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Stenson (2 years ago)
Beautiful theatre and wonderful music. Malta is a centre for arts and music like no other. Our group (friends) enjoy the music programmes here very often, and always look forward to more visits.
George Sulzbeck (2 years ago)
Very good concert hall, great acoustics, and pleasant environment. The staff is very helpful. Just avoid the gallery seats as these are not very comfortable and are often behind some column. The boxes are very good.
KateTheGamer (2 years ago)
Very nicely refurbished theatre. Lovely shows take place here. Not very pricy for what you get. Nice ambience and kind staff.
Tanya Oswald (2 years ago)
Always the best fun visiting manoel theatre. But especially in the Christmas period. Thoroughly enjoyed watching sleeping beauty. First half was a bit of a disaster as we had very bad seats which shouldn't be sold in my opinion, especially at the same price if the best seats!! But second half we changed our seats to some empty ones and thank goodness we really enjoyed it.
Gavan Hill (3 years ago)
History of the venue aside, the theatre looks nice and has an old-world charm to it. That said, avoid the boxes at all costs and get a seat in the main audience section as the boxes are cramped to put it kindly. Four seats to a box that ideally should seat three. We had to put one of the chairs in the hallway before we could even enter. My knees were bruised from the dearth of legroom. Actor-wise, the three productions we saw were all vert well done.
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