Manoel Theatre

Valletta, Malta

The Manoel Theatre is one of the oldest working theatres in Europe. Constructed in 1731 by the Grand Master Antonio Manoel de Vilhena the theatre is a baroque gem with a wonderful acoustic and a full calendar of events populated by local and international performers, with productions in English and Maltese.

The theatre is located on Old Theatre Street in Valletta. It considers itself as the country's national theatre and the home of Malta Philharmonic Orchestra. Originally called the Teatro Pubblico, its name was changed to Teatro Reale, or Theatre Royal, in 1812, and renamed Manoel Theatre in 1866. The first play to be performed was Maffei's Merope. The theatre is a small, 623 seat venue, with an oval-shaped auditorium, three tiers of boxes constructed entirely of wood, decorated with gold leaf, and a pale blue trompe-l'oeil ceiling that resembles a round cupola.

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Founded: 1731
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Paul Attard (9 months ago)
My favourite Theatre in Malta. Absolutely beautiful. Worth a visit.
Aldo Giordano (9 months ago)
The theatre hosted a concert by the Versatile Band, which was spectacular. The singers were fantastic, as was the choice of repertoire. The band played in its finest form. The sound in the theatre was excellent. An evening to remember.
Bryan (10 months ago)
Quite a unique experience. Attended for a Chopin recital, place was packed. Love how they kept its authentic style.
Daniela Muscat (10 months ago)
Beautiful 18th century theatre, highly recommend visiting for a different evening out. Boxes on the left side are a little smaller than the right and would be a little cramped at full capacity. Would recommend the gallery or middle boxes
Szopen (11 months ago)
During our visit in Malta it hapoened that the whole time Manoel theater was closed because of rehearsals. We tried several times always with the same outcome. At one point we saw the theater doors open and decided to try our luck. Artist told us about a play that will be happening the next day. Fortunately tickets were still available. Play was great and we were also able to take a good look at the theater hall. We loved it. To be honest going to see a play is the best way to visit this place.
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