Reichenbach Abbey

Reichenbach, Germany

Reichenbach Abbey, dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin,was founded in 1118 by Markgraf Diepold III of Vohburg and his mother Luitgard. During the Reformation it was looted, and secularised from 1553 to 1669, when it was re-established. It was dissolved again in 1803 during the secularisation of Bavaria. The abbey's property was confiscated by the state and eventually auctioned off in 1820.

After a couple of unsuccessful attempts to restore it as a religious house, the site was acquired in 1890 by the Brothers Hospitallers, who established a nursing home for the mentally and physically handicapped. Today there is in addition a special school teaching therapeutic care.

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Details

Founded: 1118
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Norbert Schmidt (2 years ago)
Good, very nice place!!!
Angelika Scheubeck (2 years ago)
Ist eine Einrichtung für Geistig behinderten Menschen und mit Körber Behinderung sind sehr freundlich .haben auch behinderten Werkstätten wo die Bewohner arbeiten
Kathrin Ederer (3 years ago)
Weihnachtsmarkt mit vielen kunsthandwerken sehr zum empfehlen
Meinhard Gutsche (3 years ago)
Der Weihnachtsmarkt war schön. Die Klosterschenke war gemütlich und die Preise sind mehr als O.k..
Rosi Lisius (3 years ago)
Toller Weihnachtsmarkt Nachtwächter Wanderung Ist immer einen Besuch wert
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