Gracar Turn Castle

Hrastje, Slovenia

The Gracar Turn ('Grätzer's Tower') is not recorded in medieval sources, though the historian Valvasor mentions a manor stood on the site in the 14th century, built by the Grätzer family from nearby Gradac, whence its name derives. After passing through numerous hands, it was purchased by Anton Rudež in 1821. The author Janez Trdina was often Rudež's guest at Gracar Turn; several of the former's works were written at the castle, including his best-known, Fables and Tales of the Gorjancers. During World War II part the castle was burned down by partisan fighters. It has since been renovated.

The core of the castle consists of a multi-story residential palacium, surrounded by a rectangular complex anchored by two imposing square towers.

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Address

Hrastje 7-8, Hrastje, Slovenia
See all sites in Hrastje

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matic (2 years ago)
Mystical and now abandoned castle where a murder occured just some 10 years ago. Only the outside of the building can be seen and there is no further information of the castle at the spot. It was still worth seeing this local gem.
čebelica belica (2 years ago)
Lepa narava,a žal zapuščeno
Marko Dular (3 years ago)
Pričara neke pozabljene čase
Umberto Ruggiero (3 years ago)
Chiuso e in declino. Non vale la pena andare
Viktorija Rozman Bitenc (4 years ago)
Cudoviti grad. Njegoca arhitektura sega vse v daljna stoletja nazaj. A zanimivo dejstvo, da je eden od gradov s najvec wc "na štrbunk". Iz glavnega notranjega dvorisca v enemu od arkadnih hodnikov v pritlicju vstopimo v čudovito vezico. Grad je pošteno načel zob časa kot tudi njegova zanimiva zgodba o tragicni ljubezni na gradu. Zalostno je le to, da je se eden od mnogih gradov, ki tonejo v pozabo. Ob sbojem obisku ni bilo nikogar, uoravnika ali kogarkoli od tam, ki bi bili tam konstantno prisotni. Se eden, ki slizi kot vikend, medtem ko ljudje nimajo denarja za mogočno vzdrževanje. Kulturna dediščina Slovenije v velikem delu propada, medtem ko uradi, sistem, in ljudje skrbijo le za svojo korist in čim večje finance.
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