St. Stephen's Church

Piran, Slovenia

St. Stephen's church is one of the oldest in Piran, and in the 13th and 14th centuries it was also one of the most important sacral buildings in the town.

The seat of the order of the Brotherhood of a Happy Last Hour used to be in the church, where they prayed and kept relics in the main hall and in the attic. Inside the church there are statues of the St. Stephen and St. Lawrence, as well as paintings by Jakob and Matej Palma.

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Founded: 1270
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Доктор Скачко (3 years ago)
Если вы отправились в путешествие по Европе и заехали в Словению — не забудьте посетить город Пиран. в городе Пиран ((Словения) много интересных и достойных внимания достопримечательностей. это — одна из них. А если вам нужно больше информации про ваше здоровье? Что стоит делать чтобы лечиться вылечиться и жить без болезней? ищите на YouTube видео каналы «Доктор Скачко», «Школа доктора Скачко». а также «Школа доктора Скачко» в Instagram. С уважением врач, фитотерапевт, диетолог, натуропат Борис Скачко, Украина, Киев...
Ilario Bonomi (4 years ago)
Molto rimaneggiato nel corso del tempo, è un edificio ottagonale rivestito esternamente di intonaco bianco, che ben figura sullo sfondo blu del mare, in posizione sopraelevata dietro il duomo. Una volta internamente era tutto affrescato e ancora si conserva qualche traccia di affreschi più tardi sulle pareti, mentre il soffitto è andato completamente perduto. Bella la vasca battesimale al centro.
Botond Sugár (4 years ago)
It was very loud.
Oszkár Józsa (5 years ago)
Stunning views from the viewing tower.
Bojan Benko (5 years ago)
I did not visit the church itself. I climb the tower only. At the beginning there are small wooden stairs that you need to climb. But when you reach the top that it was all worth it. View on Piran and the whole sea is absolutely stunning. If you go near this church climb the tower. It's amazing
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