Pont d'Avignon

Avignon, France

The Pont Saint-Bénézet, also known as the Pont d'Avignon, is a famous medieval bridge in the town of Avignon. It was built between 1177 and 1185. This early bridge was destroyed forty years later during the Albigensian Crusade when Louis VIII of France laid siege to Avignon. The bridge was rebuilt with 22 stone arches. It was very costly to maintain as the arches tended to collapse when the Rhône flooded. Eventually in the middle of the 17th century the bridge was abandoned.

The four surviving arches on the bank of the Rhône are believed to have been built in around 1345 by Pope Clement VI during the Avignon Papacy. The Chapel of Saint Nicholas sits on the second pier of the bridge. It was constructed in the second half of 12th century but has since been substantially altered. The western terminal, the Tour Philippe-le-Bel, is also preserved.

The bridge was the inspiration for the song Sur le pont d'Avignon and is considered a landmark of the city. In 1995, the surviving arches of the bridge, together with the Palais des Papes and Avignon Cathedral were classified as a World Heritage Site.

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Details

Founded: 1177-1185
Category:
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bishop Graham Kettle (2 years ago)
Off season so not over tourists... if that's a word. Well worth the visit by every Avignon tourist.
Ramya Gajula (2 years ago)
Well, this bridge is beautiful when viewed from the terrace at palais de papes or even from the banks of the river. The visit to the bridge is good for 1. Accessing the audio guide explaining the story behind it and 2. Catching the views of the wall and the old town
Nigel Hall (2 years ago)
A nice place to visit and step back in time
Samuel Devaux (2 years ago)
It is a must to do in order to understand the history of the city.
Albert Hu (2 years ago)
It's a definitely nice one in the city center. You can feel the passion from their service and dishes. The price is absolutely reasonable with their food quality. Strongly recommended.
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