Pont d'Avignon

Avignon, France

The Pont Saint-Bénézet, also known as the Pont d'Avignon, is a famous medieval bridge in the town of Avignon. It was built between 1177 and 1185. This early bridge was destroyed forty years later during the Albigensian Crusade when Louis VIII of France laid siege to Avignon. The bridge was rebuilt with 22 stone arches. It was very costly to maintain as the arches tended to collapse when the Rhône flooded. Eventually in the middle of the 17th century the bridge was abandoned.

The four surviving arches on the bank of the Rhône are believed to have been built in around 1345 by Pope Clement VI during the Avignon Papacy. The Chapel of Saint Nicholas sits on the second pier of the bridge. It was constructed in the second half of 12th century but has since been substantially altered. The western terminal, the Tour Philippe-le-Bel, is also preserved.

The bridge was the inspiration for the song Sur le pont d'Avignon and is considered a landmark of the city. In 1995, the surviving arches of the bridge, together with the Palais des Papes and Avignon Cathedral were classified as a World Heritage Site.

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Details

Founded: 1177-1185
Category:
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tee Dub (19 months ago)
It'll be nice when it's finished. Joking aside, it's a pleasant location and you know you want to dance on it.
Fan LIN (20 months ago)
Must use the audio guide to know the history of the bridge and why. Don’t miss the audio guide for listening to the Avignon traditional song. And also don’t miss out to the other side of the bank to see the bridge, cathedral and Palais in a frame.
Marta Jankowska (2 years ago)
Beautiful place during the day. Around this object there are great views and good routes for jogging and walking... Form my personal opinion, have eyes wide open after sunset. Definitely must see in Avignion. Just few minutes walk from there there famous fortifications in Avignon and Pope's Palace.
Taha Javaid (2 years ago)
We were charged 4 Euros to see the bridge on student discount. The normal rate is 5 Euros per person. It's the remains of the bridge that was built many centuries ago by a shepherd with help from the locals. They give you a device after you pay that tells you the history of different objects and places that are on the bridge. It's worth seeing but I don't see why charge 5 Euros for it. It should be free.
Jennifer Yates (2 years ago)
Did you know there is a song about this place? Look it up! I can't get the song out of my head like I can't get Avignon out of my head. Southern France is magical in a way that is impossible to describe. Lavender fields, citrus fruits, and cozy towns surround this impressive structure.
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