Château de la Mogére

Montpellier, France

The Château de la Mogère is one of many follies surrounding Montpellier, built by wealthy merchants in the 18th century. In 1706, the grounds of la Mogère were purchased by Fulcran Limouzin. In 1715, architect Jean Giral drew the plan for La Mogère, giving it the appearance it still has today.

Its harmonious façade is topped off by a pediment, standing against a background of pine trees, all in Renaissance-style.

The grounds and interior, currently owned by the Viscount Gaston de Saporta, are open for visits. The interior has been kept intact since the 18th century, displaying antique furniture and family portraits from the last three centuries. Amongst the painters represented here are Jean Jouvenet, Hyacinthe Rigaud and Jacques-Louis David.

The garden is a mixture of English garden and formal garden style and houses a large fountain built up out of thousands of little seashells and carrying a number of cherubs.

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Details

Founded: 1715
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Traian Traian (4 years ago)
This is not a place to visit. It is a horrible experience. I went there and for nothing. When I tried to enter and find somebody for guiding or for buying a ticket, a big black dog started barking and chased me. I had to run. Nobody came out anyway, I could have been bitten. I also tried to call but nobody answered.
Yannick G Forel Mr le Baron (4 years ago)
Beautiful place.
Natasha Gomelski (4 years ago)
Not good place for big parties
Miro Dimitrov (4 years ago)
lovely place
SuNil DiXit (4 years ago)
Good
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