Château de Beaucaire

Beaucaire, France

The Château de Beaucaire is a ruined castle in the commune of Beaucaire. Existing structures date from the 12th and 16th centuries, with other elements from various times in the Middle Ages.

First built in the 11th century, the castle was torn down on Richelieu's orders. It used to be protected by a wall, the trace of which can still be followed. It includes a strange polygonal tower perched on a rocky spur, the façades dominating the sheer drop, and a fine round corner tower. Once inside the walls, a staircase leads to a small Romanesque chapel with a charming, sculpted tympanum, and then to the musée Auguste Jacquet. The museum has exhibits on the region's archaeology (dating back more than 40,000 years) and popular arts and traditions.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bernard Vassas (4 months ago)
Outstanding remain of what used to be one of the most important and powerful fortress of the southern France. You can also walk around in its romantic gardens. Unfortunately, the access has not been upgraded for handicapped people. The visit is free.
Vanya Mihaylova (6 months ago)
Very historical medieval place! Great view from top.
Peter Wanke (7 months ago)
endless walking around the château.. I could spend there days... :-)
E KK (10 months ago)
Impressive view from the castle.
AA R (10 months ago)
Nice castle to walk along the wall
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