Mirabell Palace

Salzburg, Austria

Mirabell Palace with its gardens is part of the Historic Centre of the City of Salzburg UNESCO World Heritage Site. The palace was built about 1606 on the shore of the Salzach river north of the medieval city walls, at the behest of Prince-Archbishop Wolf Dietrich Raitenau. The Archbishop suffered from gout and had a stroke the year before; to evade the narrow streets of the city, he decided to erect a pleasure palace for him and his mistress Salome Alt. Allegedly built within six months according to Italian and French models, it was initially named Altenau Castle.

When Raitenau was deposed and arrested at Hohensalzburg Castle in 1612, his successor Mark Sittich von Hohenems expelled Salome Alt and her family from the premises. Mark Sittich gave the palace its current name from Italian word mirabile ('amazing'). It was rebuilt in a lavish Baroque style from 1721 to 1727, according to plans designed by Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt.

On 1 June 1815 the later King Otto of Greece was born here, while his father, the Wittelsbach crown prince Ludwig I of Bavaria served as stadtholder in the former Electorate of Salzburg. The current Neoclassical appearance dates from about 1818, when the place was restored after a blaze. Archbishop Maximilian Joseph von Tarnóczy resided here from 1851 to 1863. The father of Hans Makart worked here as a chamberlain. Joachim Haspinger (1776-1858), Capuchin priest and a leader of the Tyrolean Rebellion, spent his last year in a small flat.

The palace was purchased by the City of Salzburg in 1866. After World War II it was temporarily used for the mayor's office and housed several departments of the municipal administration.

Marble Hall

The Marble Hall of Mirabell Palace is the venue of the Salzburg Palace Concerts, directed by Luz Leskowitz. It is also a popular location for weddings.

Gardens

The Mirabellgarten was laid out under Prince-Archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun from 1687 according to plans designed by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach. In its geometrically-arranged gardens are mythology-themed statues dating from 1730 and four groups of sculpture, created by Italian sculptor Ottavio Mosto from 1690. It is noted for its boxwood layouts, including a sylvan theater designed between 1704 and 1718. An orangery was added in 1725.

The gardens were made accessible to the public under Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria. Up to today, it is one of the most popular tourists' attraction in Salzburg. Several scenes from The Sound of Music were filmed here.

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Details

Founded: 1606
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Llubitza Banic (2 years ago)
This place is so romantic, full of flowers, who ever was the architect did an amazing job. The gardens are spacious and free entrance You have so many mythological statues like unicorns, Pegasus , etc..... Highly recommend to pass and enjoy this place.
Justus Marsden (2 years ago)
Stunning gardens! Even in winter it's a great place to bring some lunch and look at the first flowers coming through. Only shame is the small greenhouse, which in parts looks a bit worn.. Oh and the gnome exhibition is closed in winter.
thvs86 (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful places to visit in the city. Just walking through the gardens leaves you with peace of mind, making you more relaxed and optimistic. It really helps that the place is quiet, disconnected from the turmoil of the city. If you're a history buff or just really interested in how people lived in different times (like me!) then you'll love this place because Mirabell Palace is a historical and the palace with its gardens is a listed cultural heritage monument.
Amy Marie (2 years ago)
This is one of the most beautiful places in the city. The gardens and statues are magnificent. So beautiful for photos or just to hang out for a while and take in the scenery. This is also where a couple of movies have been filmed so you might recognize the place from TV
Karolina Kaltur (2 years ago)
I visited the palace in the winter and summer time. I definitely recommend visiting it in the summer because of the beautiful gardens around full of colourful flowers. If you like this kind of stuff that's a must-see .
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