Hellbrunn Palace

Salzburg, Austria

Between 1612 and 1615, Salzburg’s prince-archbishop Markus Sittikus commissioned the building of a summer residence at the foot of Hellbrunn mountain, a location already abundant in naturally flowing waters. Based on Italian models and in a relatively short period of time, an architectural jewel had been created, still reckoned amongst the most magnificent Renaissance buildings north of the Alps. Hellbrunn was only meant for use as a day residence in summer, as the Archbishop usually returned to Salzburg in the evening, therefore, there is no bedroom in Hellbrunn.

The schloss is also famous for its jeux d'eau ('watergames') in the grounds, which are a popular tourist attraction in the summer months. These games were conceived by Markus Sittikus, a man with a keen sense of humour, as a series of practical jokes to be performed on guests. Notable features include stone seats around a stone dining table through which a water conduit sprays water into the seat of the guests when the mechanism is activated, and hidden fountains that surprise and spray guests while they take part on the tour. Other features are a mechanical, water-operated and music-playing theatre built in 1750 including some 200 automata showing various professions at work, a grotto and a crown being pushed up and down by a jet of water, symbolising the rise and fall of power. At all of these games there is always a spot which is never wet: that where the Archbishop stood or sat, to which there is no water conduit and which is today occupied by the tour guide.

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Details

Founded: 1612-1619
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Thomsit (8 months ago)
A must for anyone visiting Salzburg. The water gardens are brilliant fun with surprises at every turn. The palace is stunning. The atmosphere is tremendous and you leave smiling.
Stefanie Pryke (8 months ago)
The water park is certainly worth a visit! Such a fun little place, as long as you don't mind getting a bit wet!! Palace is a lovely place to visit too.
Aishah Bailey (10 months ago)
Catch a bus from the city centre to this gorgeous area surrounded by mountains. The advent market was enormous and stalls were varied and priced the same as in town. See the sturgeons in the pond, visit the zoo if you're there in summer (there's not that much in winter but you can still see the goats, alpaca and sheep in the petting zoo). The windows of the main palace open up like an advent calendar which is cute. Beware that the trick fountains package aren't available in December!
Gustav Lugerbauer (10 months ago)
Very beautiful and well organized Christmas market Entrance fee is good with a free drink. Nice stands very well decorated all in all fun for the whole family. There is also a very nice playground for kids
Sanat Sahasrabudhe (11 months ago)
Splendid palace in a beautiful setting. The architecture of the palace and its surrounding structures is striking, especially with the bright yellow color. The interior is also lovely, and provides great information about the history of the palace. All of it is very well-maintained. The palace gardens and expansive park are beautiful to walk in. The trick fountains are also very nicely designed. Schloss Hellbrunn is a substantial distance from the center of Salzburg, but I definitely recommend a visit. Making things easier is a bus stop right outside the main entrance.
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