Franziskischlössl

Salzburg, Austria

The Franziskischlössl ('Francis′ Castle') is a defence tower that was part of the 17th century city walls of Salzburg. It was built by the cathedral architect, Santino Solari, from 1622-1629. The Franziskischlössl is situated at the most exposed point of Mount Kapuzinerberg, home to an inn and a very popular hiking trip destination.

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Founded: 1622-1629
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

thvs86 (10 months ago)
Small, beautiful, defensive castle transformed in an inn/restaurant at the end of a spectacular hike/path through the forest. The prices are decent, the desserts are great and you should try some local refreshments. The staff speaks English and is very helpful and amiable. You can also book some rooms for the night and even have your own wedding party in this beautiful place. Be advised that the place gets crowded fast.
Wim Stuer (11 months ago)
Steep climb, but the woman serving the drinks made everything better
Vino Reddy (2 years ago)
Situated on Kapunzinerburg and overlooking Salzburg. Most incredible view of the city. Beautiful tea garden serving light meals. Not open everyday. Best to fone to check if open. I've been there four times but the restaurant was only opened once. The walk up there is so refreshing and energizing.
Triston Evans (2 years ago)
Better view of the city than the fortress in my opinion. The walk is much harder but the reward is amazing. You have to stop at the restaurant in the old Garrison and have a Stiegl and some strudel. I would describe this place and walk as peaceful, quiet and tranquil. Warning the hike up to the top is not for the weak of body or mind. ( Photo taken from sitting position at my table.)
Gilad Livnat (2 years ago)
Great view on the city of Salzburg, the climb can be made with stroller or bikes, there are also stairs and great spots to have a short break on the way to the top. The coffee house on the top is a bit pricey and it doesn't serve much but decorated amazing
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