St. Cajetan Church

Salzburg, Austria

In 1591 Archbishop Wolf Dietrich purchased a hospital and church in today's Kai District to establish a seminary. It was to be managed by an order of Theatine monks, founded by St. Cajetan and Pietro Caraffa in 1524. The order was brought to Salzburg in 1685 to found a new mission. Shortly thereafter a decision was reached to build a church and abbey in the Kai District at the very same location.

Gaspare Zugalli was commissioned as the architect and the brothers Francesco and Carl-Antonio Brenno and Antonio Carabelli provided the stuccowork. Construction of the Cajetan Church was discontinued upon Max Gandolf's death in 1687. It was completed in 1696 under Archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun and consecrated in 1700. The Theatine mission in Salzburg was dissolved in 1809 and the Cajetan Church almost fell to ruin. The church and abbey were turned over to the Brothers of Mercy in 1923, who took care of its maintenance. The building was used as a hospital during World War II. It was damaged by bombs in 1944 and later restored.

The Cajetan Church is a typical product of the Italian Baroque in Salzburg. The broad, palatial façade connects the church and abbey to form a single unit. It has a mighty tambour dome, giving the building its sacred character. The stuccowork inside the church lends a festive, elegant and distinct atmosphere. The dome, designed to allow light to flood in, dominates the room. The fresco in the mighty dome depicts the 'Glory of St. Cajetan'. The high altar has a painting of 'The Martyrdom of St. Maximilian'. The oldest preserved organ in Salzburg, built around 1700 by Christoph Egedacher, is installed above the vestibule in the gallery parapet. The Sacred Stairway, built in 1712, is a special feature of the Cajetan Church and should only be ascended on one's knees. It is still reminiscent of the baroque forms of piety.

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Details

Founded: 1685-1696
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

www.salzburg.info

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johannes Wächter (2 years ago)
A very special place to meet God. The Savior lives in the heart of the Hospital of the Merciful Brothers and invites you to meet. Here what is sick and weak can truly be healed! Come on and just give it a try. On the left side altar you can find the holy family with the mother Anna. In addition, the patron saint of Salzburg, St. Martin is depicted. He cares especially for the needy and sick!
Johannes Wächter (2 years ago)
A very special place to meet God. The Savior lives in the heart of the Hospital of the Merciful Brothers and invites you to meet. Here what is sick and weak can truly be healed! Come on and just give it a try. On the left side altar you can find the holy family with the mother Anna. In addition, the patron saint of Salzburg, St. Martin is depicted. He cares especially for the needy and sick!
K. Klaintahe (2 years ago)
Cajet Church The St. Maximilian's Kajetanerkirche is located in the Kaiviertel. It belongs to the monastery complex and resembles a palace. It was first mentioned in 1150. In its current form, it was built between 1685 and 1697. The church has three floors and is laterally surrounded by two wing buildings of the former monastery. The huge dome is particularly impressive in this church. The Holy Stairs is a sight. The altarpiece of the high altar shows the torture of St. Maximilian.
K. Kli (2 years ago)
Cajet Church The St. Maximilian's Kajetanerkirche is located in the Kaiviertel. It belongs to the monastery complex and resembles a palace. It was first mentioned in 1150. In its current form, it was built between 1685 and 1697. The church has three floors and is laterally surrounded by two wing buildings of the former monastery. The huge dome is particularly impressive in this church. The Holy Stairs is a sight. The altarpiece of the high altar shows the torture of St. Maximilian.
Brigitte Jeller (3 years ago)
We were at a memorial service for deceased people at the Brothers of Mercy. I have been in this church for the first time ..... not only the most dignified commemoration service, also the church itself is a special place. You come to rest and feel what is really important in life. Simply great what people have created with their hands. With a lot of power and love, you can feel it in every moment. Thank you for the empathetic words and dignified treatment of our deceased and survivors. Many thanks also to the KH BARMHOLZ brothers.
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