Mozart's Residence

Salzburg, Austria

In 1773, after the house in which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had been born became too small, the entire Mozart family moved across the river to the Tanzmeisterhaus on the square then known as Hannibalplatz. The building now accommodates a museum showing the various stations of the lives of the Mozart family. The building is now commonly known as Mozarts Wohnhaus and no-one knows where Hannibalplatz is as its latter-day name is Markartplatz. The existence of the building was first documented in 1617.

On the 16th October 1944 two thirds of the house were destroyed in an air raid. The owner at the time sold the bombed section of the building to Assicurazioni Generali, who then erected an office building subsequently purchased by the International Mozarteum Foundation in 1989. The International Mozarteum Foundation had already acquired the surviving section of the Tanzmeistersaal hall for museum purposes in 1955. On the 2nd May 1994 the office building was demolished and on the 4th May reconstruction of the original house was commenced according to old structural plans. In 1996 Mozart’s Wohnhaus was reopened.

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Details

Founded: 1617
Category: Museums in Austria

More Information

www.salzburg.info

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

이빨부자 Leebbal (2 months ago)
The staff was amazing. Very kind and nice with lots of interesting conversation. I started appreciating a lot more about Mozart
Yeo (3 months ago)
It's an amazing place to know more about Mozart!
ashwin kumar (4 months ago)
Beautifully maintained house with lots of history attached to it. If you are a music aficionado, you might enjoy this place a lot more!
Pui (5 months ago)
Really nice place to visit! The audio tour is great. The stories from Mozart’s father are really interesting and funny. It is hard to believe how they made music on those small little pianos. Get the Salzburg card for this visit.
Emily Sharp (5 months ago)
I enjoyed my visit here very much. I found the audio guide especially helpful and I really loved that they included so much of his music. They even had an excerpt from Leopold Mozart's work. This museum also has Mozart's harpsichord and several paintings. As someone who has spent most of my life studying his music this was a dream come true to be here.
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