Mozart's Residence

Salzburg, Austria

In 1773, after the house in which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had been born became too small, the entire Mozart family moved across the river to the Tanzmeisterhaus on the square then known as Hannibalplatz. The building now accommodates a museum showing the various stations of the lives of the Mozart family. The building is now commonly known as Mozarts Wohnhaus and no-one knows where Hannibalplatz is as its latter-day name is Markartplatz. The existence of the building was first documented in 1617.

On the 16th October 1944 two thirds of the house were destroyed in an air raid. The owner at the time sold the bombed section of the building to Assicurazioni Generali, who then erected an office building subsequently purchased by the International Mozarteum Foundation in 1989. The International Mozarteum Foundation had already acquired the surviving section of the Tanzmeistersaal hall for museum purposes in 1955. On the 2nd May 1994 the office building was demolished and on the 4th May reconstruction of the original house was commenced according to old structural plans. In 1996 Mozart’s Wohnhaus was reopened.

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Details

Founded: 1617
Category: Museums in Austria

More Information

www.salzburg.info

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Morgan Blue (10 months ago)
Boring and completely nothing I was expecting. 11€ for looking at sheets of notes is definitely too much. You’d better go to Geburtstag Haus
Amy Marie (10 months ago)
It is a pretty interesting place, as well as historic. But there is nothing memorable about it. It would be nice to visit if you are interested in the artist in particular. If not, you can skip this stop, you won't be missing out on much.
Athanasios Malamos (12 months ago)
Well organized with some instruments and interesting books. The multimedia was very interesting as well.
Hooligan Rob (12 months ago)
Go to the birth house. It's better, but if you want to see this place, get the combo tickets, much cheaper
Chris Bradley (12 months ago)
If in Salzburg then I'd recommend visiting this famous composers residence. Contains lots of interesting exhibits and video presentations.
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