The island of Gotland has many stone labyrinths, but the most famous is Trojaborg in Visby. It may have its origins in a pagan cult, but in more recent times it has been used for games and festivities.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: Medieval or earlier
Category:
Historical period: Roman Iron Age (Sweden)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Pietrow (10 months ago)
Simon Grönlund (12 months ago)
En urgammal labyrint norr om Visby lasarett. Liknande trojaborgar finns på många platser, både i Sverige och andra länder och kontinenter. Se Wikipedia för mer info. Sommaren 2018 är Trojaborg utgångspunkten för en konstorientering på drygt 2 kilometer med 10 konstverk utplacerade i naturen. Följ kartan noga och undersök terrängen. Skanna QR-koden på kartan för lite tips om vad du letar efter. Inte handikappvänlig och passar inte för barnvagn och liknande. Barn som gillar att klättra och undersöka kommer att ha kul.
oscar knekta (2 years ago)
Xenodike 82 (2 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.