Gösting Castle Ruins

Graz, Austria

The ruins of Gösting castle offer the perfect destination for a trek within easy reach of Graz. The steep but short ascent passes by the ‘Jungfernsprung’, the place from which, legend has it, the lovesick and grief-stricken Anna von Gösting threw herself to her doom. Further up, by the castle ruins, there are impressive views of the strategically important valley of the river Mur, Graz itself and the landscape around Gösting.

The castle was built in the 11th century and the first record dates from 1042. It was frequently extended until the 15th century as a fortress to provide protection against the Turks and Hungarians. It was part of the signalling fire system, which was supposed to warn the population in case of danger.

In 1707, the castle and domain were acquired by the Counts of Attems. On July 10, 1723, lightning struck the gunpowder magazine, and a large part of the castle burnt down. It was not rebuilt and in 1728 it was replaced with the new Baroque residence of the Attems family.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Ruinenweg 50, Graz, Austria
See all sites in Graz

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.graztourismus.at

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nikolai Siurdyna (19 months ago)
Stunning!
Andrea Šandová (2 years ago)
Very nice place. 20 minutes out of village by food. Beautiful ruins of old castle. There is lovely house where you can buy something to eat And drink (soups And hot food). There is no electricity And water, So it is cooked in Black kitchen :-) Very good And interesting. I recomend to see And try it :-)
Marja Ehrstedt (2 years ago)
Nice walk aprox 30 min in beautiful hillside / forest and great views.
Oleksandr Serhiienko (2 years ago)
Cool place, easy to get!) Outstanding view)
Filippo Casamassima (4 years ago)
Very nice place, close to the City. On the Castle there is a small tavern, inside the castle! It is quite spartan, as is should be. The ladies there bring every day all the food. It was open also during winter, with Snow on the road! You can get a soup or a beer for 2-3 Eur.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.