St. Michael's Church

Munich, Germany

St. Michael's Jesuit church in Munich is the largest Renaissance church north of the Alps. The style of the building had an enormous influence on Southern German early Baroque architecture.

The church was built by William V, Duke of Bavaria between 1583 and 1597 as a spiritual center for the Counter Reformation. In order to realise his ambitious plans for the church and the adjoining college, Duke William had 87 houses in the best location pulled down, ignoring the protests of the citizens. The church was erected in two stages. In the first stage (1583-88), the church was built by the model of Il Gesù in Rome and given a barrel-vaulted roof by an unknown architect, the vault being the largest in the world apart from that of St Peter's in Rome, spanning freely more than 20 meters. When the church was built, there were doubts about the stability of the vaulting. But it was the tower that collapsed in 1590, destroying the just completed quire. Duke William V took it as a bad omen and so planned to build a much larger church. The second phase of construction continued until the consecration of the church in 1597. Friedrich Sustris built on to the undamaged nave a new quire and a transept and a magnificent facade. The church is 78.2 meters long, 20.3 meters wide and 28.2 meters high.

The facade is impressive and contains standing statues of Duke Wilhelm and earlier rulers of the Bavarian Wittelsbach dynasty, cast in bronze, in the form of a family tree. Hubert Gerhard's large bronze statue between the two entrances shows the Archangel Michael fighting for the Faith and killing the Evil in the shape of a humanoid demon.

The interior is a representation of the triumph of Catholicism as true Christianity during the Counter-Reformation. The heavily indented chancel arch as well as the short side aisles and even the side chapels are designed as a triumphal arch to ancient model. A very deep choir room adjoins the mighty nave. The stucco decoration of the nave represents the life of Jesus Christ. The altarpiece 'Annunciation' was created by Peter Candid (1587). The sculpture of the holy angel in the nave from Hubert Gerhard (1595) was originally intended for the tomb of William V, which was not completed.

Having suffered severe damage during the Second World War, the church was restored in 1946-48. Finally, between 1980 and 1983, the stucco-work was restored.

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Address

Ettstraße, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1583-1597
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

david antoun (43 days ago)
Largest Renaissance Jesuitical church with lots of sculptures and paintings. A St.Micheal statue with a well for holy water welcomes you at the entrance and then you walk through history of architecture until you reach a burial place for royal Bavarian family under the church with entrance of 2 euros.
Layla A. A (3 months ago)
I am mind blown by the artifacts and paintings. There’s always something to see. Mind blowing experience
Mayur Alaspure (4 months ago)
Big and beautiful church. Tourist attraction. Church kept very clean.
Daries RA (6 months ago)
I am impressed, a very beautiful church, with the possibility of an entry in the book
Nick Wolfe (12 months ago)
One of the most beautiful churches in the whole city and a true place for peace and reflection in the hustle and bustle of the city centre. Always a pleasure. If you look out, there are often organ concerts and the like. Absolutely worth a visit!
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