The oldest historical documents of Wasserburg castle dates back to 1185. The aristocrat Dietmar von Wasserburg was the first noted owner of the estate. Until the 13th century wasserburg remained in the possession of the von Wasserburg line the most notable member being Heinrich von Wasserburg who was the brother in law of the famouse minnesinger Ulirch von Lichtenstein. Legend says that von Lichtenstein took a leading role in the liberation of King Lionheart during his Austrian imprisonment. In 1238 the nobleman Otto von Haslau took possession of Wasserburg. A couple of years later the estate change through marriage into the possession of the aristocratic Puchberger line.

In the 14th century the von Toppel family inhabitated Wasserburg but already in 1515 Christoph von Zinzendorf bought Wasserburg and incorporated it into the family’s possession of vast estates throughout the Austrian imperial lands. The Zinzendorfs used Wasserburg as their ancestral home and main family estate for more than 400 years. In 1813 Count Heinrich von Baudissin adopted the crest and the name of the departed Heinrich von Zinzendorf. Count Baudissin-Zinzendorf who originally came from Holstein in Germany introduced the protestant tradition of the christmas tree to Austria, it is said that the Christmas tree of 1827 in Wasserburg was the first of its kind in the Austrian Empire.

1912 Count Baudissin-Zinzendorf sold Wasserburg to Count Heinrich Fuenfkirchen. During the Great War the castle functioned as a recreation home for soldiers from the front. In 1923 Count Carl Hugo Seilern and Aspang bought the estate and it remains until today in the possession of the Seilern-Aspang family.

Today Wasserburg can be rented. There is also a yoga center.

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Details

Founded: c. 1185
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.schloss-wasserburg.com

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roman Lechner (8 months ago)
It's an amazing historical castle. It has especially smart neighbors. ?
Anupam Panwar (23 months ago)
Schloss Wasserburg was one of the best travel decisions and an extremely beautiful property. The owner was very friendly and courteous and provided every facility to keep us comfortable. The castle is impeccably clean and one can explore the grounds, go fishing or cycling at your ones own pace. My regret was the time crunch due to which I couldn't explore the trails. I would definitely like to stay in the castle once again.
Anupam Panwar (23 months ago)
Schloss Wasserburg was one of the best travel decisions and an extremely beautiful property. The owner was very friendly and courteous and provided every facility to keep us comfortable. The castle is impeccably clean and one can explore the grounds, go fishing or cycling at your ones own pace. My regret was the time crunch due to which I couldn't explore the trails. I would definitely like to stay in the castle once again.
Ankit Sharma (2 years ago)
We attended the wedding of friends here. I have to say that our experience at the castle rates as perhaps the best 24 hours of our lives. The friendly, attentive, knowlegable staff, historic setting, and lovely rooms were amazing. We were impressed by the thoughtful melding of historic setting with modern conveniences. This experience exceeded our already lofty expectations.
Unnati Ghosh (2 years ago)
Schloss Wasserburg(Castle) is one of the most magical places I’ve had the privilege to stay at.. The hospitality and service was over the top as they took care of every need and desire we had. I don’t have words to describe the quality and taste of the food that prepared. The rest of the staff and help could not do enough to make us all feel comfortable. Hats off. It was an amazing week with memories to last a lifetime. Schloss Wasserburg(Castle) should be put on your bucket list.
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