The oldest part of Ekeby Church is the Romanesque tower, dating from the end of the 12th century. The nave and choir were built around a century later in Gothic style. The tower was also heightened to its present height at the end of the 13th century.

Most notable in the exterior of the church are the two southern portals, which are richly decorated with stone carvings. These were originally painted, and fragments of colour survive. Inside, the church is profusely decorated with frescos. The nave has frescos from the 13th, 14th and 18th century, and the choir from the early 19th century in the form of blue trompe l'oeil draperies. Among the other frescos, the large frescos depicting the apostles are the oldest, from the end of the 13th century. Under them are frescos done by the Master of the Passion of Christ depicting, on the northern wall, the Passion of Christ and, on the southern, the childhood of Jesus. During a renovation in 2004, further frescos were discovered. Originally, all the windows had stained glass panes, but today only a few original remain.

An unusual niche in the choir, probably designed as a storage for the bread and wine from the Eucharist, retains remarkably well-preserved paintings from the end of the 13th century. Among the furnishings, the accomplished Romanesque triumphal cross deserves mention. It is from the end of the 12th century. The sandstonebaptismal font is also an unusual fine piece, from approximately the same time. Scholars believe that it may have been made by either Master Majestatis or Hegvald.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justin Beelen (16 months ago)
Good
Philip Othberg (3 years ago)
En utav Gotlands finare kyrkor, rekommenderar att man gör en Gotland runt o besöker alla kyrkorna.
Philip Othberg (3 years ago)
One of Gotland's finer churches, recommends that you make a Gotland around and visit all the churches.
angelica gardell (4 years ago)
nice place
Mathias Granqvist (4 years ago)
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