The oldest parts of Gerum Church are the choir and apse, dating from circa 1200 and Romanesque in style. The presently visible, Gothic nave dates from a later time of the 13th century and probably replaced an earlier, Romanesque nave. The tower, which was never finished, was built circa 1300. The only non-medieval part of the church is the sacristy, built in 1835.

Gerum Church is constructed of limestone. The exterior is whitewashed apart from several finely carved stone details. The façade is broken by four windows on the southern side while the northern completely lacks windows. The church has three portals, one Romanesque in the choir and two Gothic in the nave and tower, respectively. The Gothic portals are decorated with stone sculptures. Inside, the church carries frescos from at least three different periods: the 13th century, the 15th century (by the Master of the Passion of Christ) and the 18th century. The church also has a decorated stained glass window from the 14th century.

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Address

544, Gerum, Sweden
See all sites in Gerum

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kaj Midenkrantz (2 years ago)
Fin kyrka typiskt Gotland kyrka
Kaj Midenkrantz (2 years ago)
Nice church typical Gotland church
Anders Tengquist (2 years ago)
Typisk Gotlandskyrka
Anders Tengquist (2 years ago)
Typical Gotland church
Jan Nilsson (2 years ago)
Trevlig Gotlandsturné med gott om plats
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