Linde Church is a homogeneous Romanesque church. Construction of the presently visible church started in the late 12th century and was finished in the early 13th century. A single, large Gothic window was inserted in the eastern wall in the 14th century.

The external nave and choir portals are both decorated with Romanesque sculptures. Inside, the church is decorated with frescos. On the northern wall is a set of paintings depicting the Passion of Christ, dating from the 15th century. On the western wall is another set, also from the 15th century, depicting women being harassed by devils. Among the church furnishings, the altarpiece from 1521 is especially noteworthy. It depicts God the Father with Christ, with Saint Giles and Saint Olaf on each side of them. Additionally, the doors of the altarpiece contain sculptures of the apostles, Saint Canute, Saint Eric and Saint Bridget. The church furthermore contains a copy of a triumphal cross today kept in the Swedish History Museum. The original dates from the end of the 12th century. The church furthermore rather unusually contains two baptismal fonts. Both are probably from the 12th century, and one may be a work by the stonemason Hegvald.

South-west of the church lie the ruins of a medieval house, probably the former parsonage.

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Address

545, Linde, Sweden
See all sites in Linde

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piter Pan (13 months ago)
Linde romanska 1200-talskyrka påminner till det yttre om Levide kyrka eller Hangvars och Halls kyrkor i samma stift. Det är lätt att tro att kyrkan uppförts av grå kalksten i enhetligt sammanhang. Istället har det skett etappvis. Allra först vid slutet av 1100-talet eller början av 1200 byggdes kor och absid. Cirka fyra decennier senare uppfördes långhuset, vars kryssvalv bärs upp av en mittpelare. Vid mitten av 1200-talet tillkom slutligen tornet. Under 1300-talet försågs absiden med ett fönster i gotik. Triumfbågen vidgades och fick en spetsig utformning. Medeltida kalkmålningar pryder interiören. Här, liksom i flera andra gotländsk kyrkor, har den flitige 1400-talskyrkomålaren Passionsmästaren varit verksam med sin bildsvit ur Kristi lidandes historia. I tornkammaren och långhuset finns målningar från 1300-talet av apostlar, var och en i ädikula. (Wikipedias text)
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