Michaelbeuern Abbey

Dorfbeuern, Austria

A monastic cell existed in Dorfbeuern as early as 736 or thereabouts, referred to in the Aachen Monastery Register in 817. After the Hungarian wars, reconstruction began in 977 with an endowment from Emperor Otto II. More times of crisis came upon the abbey with the fire of 1346, mismanagement of the prebendal income and the effects of the Reformation.

From the 17th century however Michaelbeuern began a long period of prosperity, which led to ambitious building works, for example the Baroque high altar of 1691 in the abbey church, by Meinrad Guggenbichler and Johann Michael Rottmayr. At this time more than twenty-five monks of Michaelbeuern gained their doctorates at the Benedictine University of Salzburg. The community also took on many pastoral responsibilities in the surrounding parishes. During the National Socialist period the monks were expelled, but returned after World War II. The abbey church, re-romanised, was re-dedicated in 1950.

The abbey today is a thriving Benedictine community, well known as an educational and cultural centre. The abbey runs a school and owns different business like a farm, a district heating plant, a biogas plant and a participation in a brewery (Augustiner Bräu Kloster Mülln).

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Details

Founded: 8th century
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Reichl (19 months ago)
Always worth a trip!
Josef Fuchs (2 years ago)
A very nice monastery with an extensive library!
Josef Fuchs (2 years ago)
A very nice monastery with an extensive library!
Franz Sch (2 years ago)
Beautifully restored abbey church with a great altar, currently still a construction site in the courtyard of the abbey, but otherwise it looks great. We also visited the neighboring inn, highly recommended. Beer from the Augustinerbräu in Salzburg. Service very nice, great garden
Franz Sch (2 years ago)
Beautifully restored abbey church with a great altar, currently still a construction site in the courtyard of the abbey, but otherwise it looks great. We also visited the neighboring inn, highly recommended. Beer from the Augustinerbräu in Salzburg. Service very nice, great garden
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