Bolzano Victory Monument

Bolzano, Italy

Bolzano Victory Monument was erected on the personal orders of Benito Mussolini in South Tyrol, which had been annexed from Austria after World War I. The 19 metre wide Victory Gate was designed by architect Marcello Piacentini and substituted the former Austrian Kaiserjäger monument, torn down in 1926–27. Its construction in Fascist style, displaying lictorial pillars, was dedicated to the 'Martyrs of World War I'. The monument was inaugurated on 12 July 1928 by King Victor Emmanuel III and major representatives of the fascist government.

The inscription, referring to Roman imperial history, was seen as provocative by many within the German-speaking majority in the province of South Tyrol. Since its construction, the monument has been a focal point of the tensions between the Italian and German speaking communities in Bolzano and in the whole region; after various attempts to blow it up carried out by South Tyrolean separatist groups in the late 1970s, it has been fenced off to protect it from further defacement.

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Details

Founded: 1928
Category: Statues in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zofia Francis (2 years ago)
The meuseum was really informative and well laid out
Jampa Gyatso (2 years ago)
This monument built by fascist Italy to commemorate the annexation of Süd Tirol after 1918. It has the fascist symbols like the fasci and the heads of fascist soldiers. SELBSTBESTIMMUNG UND FREIHEIT FÜR SÜD TIROL !
Luki I (2 years ago)
The guide was really stressed and our class learnd pretty nothing
Thomas Nussbaumer (2 years ago)
Honsetly not giving the monument 4 points, but rather the location. Don't get me wrong, the monument is pretty cool too, but the location is what makes it into a great place for me. Near the city but with a very nice park next to it, that allows for some very comfortable walks throughout the entire year (if you're dressed for it) and every saturday there is a weekly market, where there are a bunch of streetvendors. As I've said, the location makes the monument a lot more interessting.
Rodrigo Berriel (2 years ago)
Majestic monument!
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