Bolzano Victory Monument

Bolzano, Italy

Bolzano Victory Monument was erected on the personal orders of Benito Mussolini in South Tyrol, which had been annexed from Austria after World War I. The 19 metre wide Victory Gate was designed by architect Marcello Piacentini and substituted the former Austrian Kaiserjäger monument, torn down in 1926–27. Its construction in Fascist style, displaying lictorial pillars, was dedicated to the 'Martyrs of World War I'. The monument was inaugurated on 12 July 1928 by King Victor Emmanuel III and major representatives of the fascist government.

The inscription, referring to Roman imperial history, was seen as provocative by many within the German-speaking majority in the province of South Tyrol. Since its construction, the monument has been a focal point of the tensions between the Italian and German speaking communities in Bolzano and in the whole region; after various attempts to blow it up carried out by South Tyrolean separatist groups in the late 1970s, it has been fenced off to protect it from further defacement.

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Details

Founded: 1928
Category: Statues in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pasko Zhelev (2 years ago)
Average monument! Nothing too spectacular.
Y not Now (2 years ago)
I agree. It is a monument. It does not pretend otherwise. 5 stars for honesty
Marina Lupu (3 years ago)
It has its value as a part of the history. A controversial past.
Nana Fyna (4 years ago)
I don't know
Rangi Haris (4 years ago)
Historical place
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