Greifenstein Castle Ruins

Terlano, Italy

Greifenstein castle was first mentioned in 1158. The castle was largely destroyed in the second half of the 13th century during the wars between Count Meinhard II of Tyrol-Gorizia and the Bishop of Trent. The reconstructed castle became property of the lords of Starkenberg after the last member of the family of Greifenstein was killed in the Battle of Sempach in 1386.

Greifenstein was besieged for weeks by Duke Frederick IV of Austria-Tyrol first in 1418 and again in 1423. During the second time castle was conquered in 1426. After the Habsburg family took the possession. Today Greifenstein lies in ruins.

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Via Merano 114, Terlano, Italy
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Founded: c. 1158
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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