Fort Vrmac is a former fortification of the Austro-Hungarian Empire located on the southern end of the Vrmac ridge near Tivat. Established in 1860, the present structure was built between 1894 and 1897, and saw action during the First World War, when it was heavily bombarded by the Montenegrins. It was repaired and disarmed before the end of the war and was abandoned after a period of occupation by Yugoslav troops. Today it is one of the best preserved Austro-Hungarian fortifications in the Bay of Kotor area.

The fort comprises a heavily reinforced stone and concrete structure situated within a ditch, defended by three caponiers. There is a single entrance on the north side, accessed from the ditch and protected by a caponier. The design is similar to that of the 'Vogl period' fortresses in South Tyrol, with an irregular pentagonal shape constructed on two levels. The main guns were housed in armoured casemates, with howitzers and observation turrets in steel cupolas made by Škoda in Pilsen.

The roof of the fort is a 1.5 m thick slab of concrete that was installed in 1906–1907 following improvements to Montenegrin artillery capabilities. The barracks rooms are located on the ground and first floors on the north side while the casemates are situated on the other sides of the fort, facing towards what was then potentially hostile territory. A separate structure a short distance to the north of the fort was used as an ammunition magazine.

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Kotor, Montenegro
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Details

Founded: 1860
Category: Castles and fortifications in Montenegro

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jean Baptiste (2 years ago)
Fantastic climb from Kotor (Muo) in the morning, when the sun rises over the Bay of Kotor. Beware snakes and horseflies.
phong le (3 years ago)
Awesome walk and views of the bays on both sides of the mountain. Excellent path and well worth the 3-4 hours up and down. Bring water and snacks. There's nothing up there to buy. If you get lucky you can see the shepherd herding her goats.
Ian Schultz (3 years ago)
Fantastic climb, great views, and a stunning abandoned fortress. Well worth the effort.
Irina Ideas (3 years ago)
Great place accesible by both car and walking from either Tivat or Kotor. There is a surprisingly well preserved Austro Hungarian fortress and also beautiful forest which makes it a very pleasant walk. The only down side is the amount of rubbish that sometimes people leave around sadly. Hopefully that aspect will improve soon as people start to appreciate nature.
David Wills (4 years ago)
Fantastic old fort and amazing walk from Kotor zig zagging up the side of the mountain. So much old military history hidden in the ruins and well worth a checkout
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