Catacombs of Generosa

Rome, Italy

The Catacomb of Generosa is part of an archeological complex, rich of remains not just Christian, but also pagan. The catacomb is situated inside a hill and occupies a single level. The former entrance of the catacomb, just like other Roman catacombs, was inside a basilica, built under Pope Damasus I in the second half of 4th century, whose remains have been discovered by Giovanni Battista de Rossi in the 19th century. In the apse a fenestella confessionis (little window for confession) allowed to see the main place of worship, while a side door gave access to the catacomb.

According to the tradition, the catacomb first served as burial place for martyrs Simplicius and Faustinus, killed in 303 under Diocletian. The hypogeum graveyard served mainly for the entombment of the farmers of the surroundings and therefore it shows a sober and poor style. Near 382 Pope Damasus built the semi-hypogeum basilica and the catacomb ceased being a graveyard and became a place of worship of the martyrs there buried. In 682 Pope Leo II moved the relics of the martyrs of Generosa in the church of Santa Bibiana on the Esquiline Hill: the catacomb was thereby gradually abandoned and its location was forgotten.

The discovery, in the 19th century, of marble inscriptions inspired the interest of the archaeologist Giovanni de Rossi, who in 1868 discovered the remains of the basilica and soon after the Catacomb of Generosa. The catacomb was restored in the 1930s by Enrico Josi. Further archaeological campaigns were carried out between 1980 and 1986.

The most important place of all the catacomb is the martyrs crypt, at the back of the apse of the external basilica. It hosted a fresco with Byzantine features, called Coronatio Martyrum, dating back to 6th century. It portrays five figures: the central one is Christ, handing out the crown of martyrdom to Simplicius, with Beatrix at his side; on the left of Christ are Faustinus, bearing the palm of martyrdom in his hand, and Rufinianus. The fresco was seriously damaged when Giovanni Battista de Rossi, in the 19th century, attempted to tear it off.

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Details

Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniele Barilani (19 months ago)
elena ferri (19 months ago)
Steada troppo stretta.
Domenico Carbone (2 years ago)
Catacombe molto interessanti anche se molto è stato depredato
Daniela Macellari (2 years ago)
In passato queste catacombe non sono state protette dai vandalismi. Ora sono chiuse, ma rimane ben poco all'interno da poter ammirare.
Vasili Timonen (3 years ago)
This set of catacombs is historically associated with the martyrs SS Simplicius, Faustinus and Beatrice -the "Portuensian Martyrs". A 4th century church dedicated to them stood here, and scanty ruins of it survive. Mass is celebrated on the altar in the basilica ruins on 29 July, which is the feast-day of the martyrs. It is also occasionally celebrated for pilgrim groups. When suburban development began of the area in the Fifties, a group of parishioners of what is now "Santa Maria del Rosario ai Martiri Portuensi" took an interest. This group became the present "Comitato di Catacombe Generosa". They were able to protest against any development threatening the site, and in 1965 were able to conduct their first guided tour of the catacombs. These continue to the present day, about once a month. The entrance to the catacombs is towards the end of the Via delle Catacombe di Generosa, which is a dead-end street. If you are visiting privately, drive down this until you see a car park on your left. You should be able to find a space here. Just before the car park is a free-standing two-storey house with its frontage very near the street, and next to this is a derelict little building. In between the two is a narrow footpath without a sign, which leads to the grassed area containing the catacomb site. The car park concerned is for the local residents, so it is requested that not more than one vehicle come here at any one time -and no coaches.
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