Villa Trissino

Vicenza, Italy

Villa Trissino was mainly built in the 16th century and is associated by tradition with the architect Andrea Palladio. The building is of undeniable importance in the Palladio 'mythos'. Since 1994 the villa has been part of a World Heritage Site which was designated to protect the Palladian buildings of Vicenza and Veneto area.

It is uncertain whether this villa was designed by Palladio, but it is one of the centres if not, in fact, the origin of his myth. For, tradition holds that right here, in the second half of the 1530s, the Vicentine noble Giangiorgio Trissino (1478–1550) met the young mason Andrea di Pietro at work on the building of his villa. Somehow intuiting the youth’s potential and talent, Trissino took charge of his future formation, introduced him into the Vicentine aristocracy and, in the space of a few years, transformed him into the architect who bore the aulic name of Palladio.

Trissino did not demolish the pre-existing building, but redesigned it to give priority to the principal facade facing south. This gesture was a sort of manifesto of membership in the new constructional culture based on the rediscovery of ancient Roman architecture. Between the two existing towers Trissino inserted a two-storey, arcaded loggia. Trissino reorganised the spaces into a sequence of lateral rooms, which differ in dimensions but are linked by a system of inter-related proportions, a matrix which would become a key theme in Palladio’s design method.

Building works were certainly concluded by 1538. At the end of the eighteenth century the Vicentine architect Ottone Calderari heavily modified the structure, and in the first years of the twentieth century a second campaign of works cancelled out the last traces of the Gothic building by accomplishing its belated “Palladianisation”.

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Details

Founded: 1530s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Umberto Miglioranza (2 years ago)
Ottimo pranzo di pesce Antipasti primi e secondi molto buoni In particolare gli antipasti di pesce marinato speciali. Unica nota stonata un servizio un po' ansioso nel servire e nel sbarazzare il tavolo
My Life (2 years ago)
Era chiusa
Liza Dengler (2 years ago)
Вилла Палладио в прекрасном состоянии , в которой живут люди.
Andrea Giacon (2 years ago)
Non visitabile al pubblico.
Valter Lucietto (3 years ago)
Una villa datata
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