Villa Trissino

Vicenza, Italy

Villa Trissino was mainly built in the 16th century and is associated by tradition with the architect Andrea Palladio. The building is of undeniable importance in the Palladio 'mythos'. Since 1994 the villa has been part of a World Heritage Site which was designated to protect the Palladian buildings of Vicenza and Veneto area.

It is uncertain whether this villa was designed by Palladio, but it is one of the centres if not, in fact, the origin of his myth. For, tradition holds that right here, in the second half of the 1530s, the Vicentine noble Giangiorgio Trissino (1478–1550) met the young mason Andrea di Pietro at work on the building of his villa. Somehow intuiting the youth’s potential and talent, Trissino took charge of his future formation, introduced him into the Vicentine aristocracy and, in the space of a few years, transformed him into the architect who bore the aulic name of Palladio.

Trissino did not demolish the pre-existing building, but redesigned it to give priority to the principal facade facing south. This gesture was a sort of manifesto of membership in the new constructional culture based on the rediscovery of ancient Roman architecture. Between the two existing towers Trissino inserted a two-storey, arcaded loggia. Trissino reorganised the spaces into a sequence of lateral rooms, which differ in dimensions but are linked by a system of inter-related proportions, a matrix which would become a key theme in Palladio’s design method.

Building works were certainly concluded by 1538. At the end of the eighteenth century the Vicentine architect Ottone Calderari heavily modified the structure, and in the first years of the twentieth century a second campaign of works cancelled out the last traces of the Gothic building by accomplishing its belated “Palladianisation”.

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Details

Founded: 1530s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Fabrizio Pivari (15 months ago)
This Palladian villa is simply splendid
andrea fanchin (3 years ago)
It is a magnificent villa with an equally immense and fantastic park, designed for the humanist Giangiorgio Trissino between 1478 and 1550. He is not from the architect Andrea Palladio, but from here the young stonemason Andrea Di Pietro who worked in the yard of the villa he was noted by the Trissino who made him study architecture, took him with him to Rome to learn about the classicism of the buildings and introduced him to the noble and aristocratic circles of Vicenza and beyond. It was the "Boom". Giangiorgio Trissino transformed him into an architect and changed his name. Thus was born the architect Andrea Palladio. Since the mid-1990s it has been a UNESCO world heritage site. Over the years the villa underwent many transformations that lasted until 1800.
Yao WU (3 years ago)
Private house, very different plan from other villa by palladio.
Matteo Cunico (3 years ago)
Splendid villa where Andrea Palladio's career began
Umberto Miglioranza (4 years ago)
Ottimo pranzo di pesce Antipasti primi e secondi molto buoni In particolare gli antipasti di pesce marinato speciali. Unica nota stonata un servizio un po' ansioso nel servire e nel sbarazzare il tavolo
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