The Villa Angarano was originally conceived by Andrea Palladio who published a plan in his book I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura. Work was started on the wings of Palladio's design in the 1540s or 1540s . A decision appears to have been reached to leave a pre-existing house in the middle of the site. The proposed Palladian villa was never built: Palladio's patron may have been obliged to halt the project for financial reasons. However, the central building was eventually rebuilt after a plan by Baldassarre Longhena, which is not Palladian in style.

The original design included areas to serve as cellars, stables, dove-houses, wineries, and other utilitarian spaces. However, not all of these features were actually built.

Although the building as it stands is only partly by Palladio, in 1996 UNESCO included it in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Details

Founded: 1540s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Lisa Vi (2 years ago)
FANTASTICA come tutte le ville Antiche. Avrebbe però bisogno di una bella rinfrescata esterna. Resta comunque fantastica.
Federica Violatto (3 years ago)
Consiglio a tutti di visitare la villa, l'accoglienza è ottima, i vini eleganti, come le proprietarie. Tanto di cappello alle cinque sorelle Ca' Michiel che egregiamente hanno abbracciato il biologico non sempre una scelta facile. Una vera chicca, è come ritrovare il tempo perduto... a Villa Ancarano si respira arte e amore per le cose fatte nel rispetto del tempo e dell'ambiente. Evviva le donne!
Yannick G Forel Mr le Baron (3 years ago)
Highly recommended beautiful place
Antonio Vagliano (3 years ago)
Fantastica villa veneta concepita dal Palladio, ottimamente tenuta ed i cui spazi esterni sono talvolta luogo di ritrovo con mercatini di prodotti artigianali . Molto interessante la mostra inaugurata oggi di vasi e sculture in ceramica trattati manualmente con calce viva dall'artista Maruzza, una delle cinque sorelle Bianchi Michiel proprietarie della villa. Affascinante il panorama circostante.
Joao Cesar Escossia (7 years ago)
Super! Fantastic!!!
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