The Villa Forni Cerato is a 16th-century villa in Montecchio Precalcino. Its design is attributed to Andrea Palladio and his client is assumed to have been Girolamo Forni, a wealthy wood merchant who supplied building material for a number of the Palladio's projects. The attribution to Palladio is partly on stylistic grounds, although this is a complicated issue - the building departs from the Palladian norms.

The villa was probably built in the 1540s modifying an existing building on the site. The double name Forni-Cerato, which it is always given, dates back to 1610. Both its attribution to Palladio and the assumption that Girolamo Forni had it built remain a matter of speculation. The first reference to the architect being Palladio is in the 18th century. However, modern research agrees almost unanimously with their opinion.

The body of the building has not undergone any significant changes with the exception of the back, which had a serliana, which was replaced by a balcony. The outline of the rear serliana is still visible.

Today, the only authentic sculptural decoration appears to be a mask over the round arch of the entrance serliana which is attributed to Alessandro Vittoria.

In 1996 UNESCO included the building in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'. The villa is in a poor state of conservation.

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Details

Founded: 1540s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claudia Girardin (10 months ago)
Engaging and exciting visit.
C&C SERRAMENTI (10 months ago)
Historic Venetian villa we recommend the visit and above all we hope it will return to illuminate the eyes with its beauty. Palladio would be happy
Veronica Capelli (18 months ago)
Villa Forni Cerato, which I was lucky enough to visit thanks to the availability of the owner Ivo Boscardin and the architect Francesca Grandi, is a small jewel located in a predominantly rural context. Entering it seems to go back in time and it is the villa itself that tells its story and that of the generations that have been able to live it. It was a wonderful experience and I hope that this world heritage can be rediscovered and enhanced, but that it can, at the same time, maintain that character of "naturalness" that distinguishes it and differentiates it from other Venetian villas.
Hans Arne Westberg Gjersøe (2 years ago)
I have for a long time followed this villa on social media and I have become more and more curious about it . When I finally managed to see it I loved it. Nice countryside around and one could feel the 1565 atmosphere. It is not an Emo or a Barbaro but for sure it deserves a visit.
Becka M (2 years ago)
Still a beautiful place. Loses a star because it's hard to photograph without getting orange fencing in your shot.
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