Risiera di San Sabba

Trieste, Italy

Risiera di San Sabba is a five-storey brick-built compound located in Trieste, that functioned during World War II as a Nazi concentration camp for the detention and killing of political prisoners, and a transit camp for Jews, most of whom were then deported to Auschwitz. SS members Odilo Globocnik and Karl Frenzel, and Ivan Marchenko are all said to have participated in the killings at this camp. The cremation facilities, the only ones built inside a concentration camp in Italy, were installed by Erwin Lambert. Today, the former concentration camp operates as a civic museum.

The building was erected in 1913 and first used as a rice-husking facility (hence the name 'Risiera'). During World War II, German occupation forces in Trieste used the building to transport, detain and exterminate prisoners. Many occupants of Risiera di San Sabba were transported to the German Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in Occupied Poland. Historians estimate that over 3,000 people were killed at the Risiera camp and thousands more imprisoned and transported elsewhere. The majority of prisoners came from Friuli, the Julian March and the Province of Ljubljana.

After the war, the camp served as a refugee center and transit point. In the 1950s, many people, especially ethnic Italians fleeing then communist Yugoslavia, passed through the camp, not to mention Croats and Russians, whose home was San Sabba, San Sabba Annex, Opicina, Gesuiti for more than three years before they were able to emigrate elsewhere.

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Details

Founded: 1913
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reynolds Velayo (18 months ago)
They preserved the history beautifully, regardless of the pain and agony that occurred here.
Zsolt Szegedi (19 months ago)
This is a less known, yet very important site to visit. A remarkable monument of an era that should not be forgotten. For 2 euros only you can buy an audio guide which I really recommend to do so, as otherwise you won't understand what to look at and you won't have all the background information. If you get there by car the most convenient is to park at the supermarket's parking lot nearby.
Phill Smissen (20 months ago)
Small outpost of Nazi/Fascist era... Viewable in about an hour...
David Borso (2 years ago)
Really nice museum! The entry to the museum is free and the audio guide costs only 2€. It shows the horrific things that were happening back then, I can't even imagine how it was in other bigger concentration camps.
Hansi Hinterseer (2 years ago)
The Risiera is a point of reference for anyone interested in how World War II affected the region. That said, politicians and the museum have not recognized the potential and offer a rather small exhibit that lacks proper context. One leaves feeling that Fascism and Nazism killed the political and racial victims - common Italians were not really involved in the entire process it seems!
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