Risiera di San Sabba

Trieste, Italy

Risiera di San Sabba is a five-storey brick-built compound located in Trieste, that functioned during World War II as a Nazi concentration camp for the detention and killing of political prisoners, and a transit camp for Jews, most of whom were then deported to Auschwitz. SS members Odilo Globocnik and Karl Frenzel, and Ivan Marchenko are all said to have participated in the killings at this camp. The cremation facilities, the only ones built inside a concentration camp in Italy, were installed by Erwin Lambert. Today, the former concentration camp operates as a civic museum.

The building was erected in 1913 and first used as a rice-husking facility (hence the name 'Risiera'). During World War II, German occupation forces in Trieste used the building to transport, detain and exterminate prisoners. Many occupants of Risiera di San Sabba were transported to the German Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in Occupied Poland. Historians estimate that over 3,000 people were killed at the Risiera camp and thousands more imprisoned and transported elsewhere. The majority of prisoners came from Friuli, the Julian March and the Province of Ljubljana.

After the war, the camp served as a refugee center and transit point. In the 1950s, many people, especially ethnic Italians fleeing then communist Yugoslavia, passed through the camp, not to mention Croats and Russians, whose home was San Sabba, San Sabba Annex, Opicina, Gesuiti for more than three years before they were able to emigrate elsewhere.

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Founded: 1913
Category: Industrial sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

metalpsyche82 (14 months ago)
No pictures allowed inside. Free entrance. 15 minutes tops to take in the site. Wide free parking lot next to it.
Donal Corcoran (21 months ago)
Sad but enlightening. Definitely worth a visit to see crimes against a minority group.
Miran Ibrahimagic (2 years ago)
A must see. However, this a dark monument to even darker history of the WWII. But, it gives you insight and leaves sour taste in your mouth. Not for children.
Francesco Gotti (2 years ago)
I would advice to take the audio guide for understanding better. The museum is full of interesting explanations, on the contrary there are no explanations around the concentration camp.
Reynolds Velayo (2 years ago)
They preserved the history beautifully, regardless of the pain and agony that occurred here.
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