Roman Amphitheatre

Trieste, Italy

The Teatro Romano in Trieste was built in the first century BC and expanded in the second century AD. It had seats for from 3,500 to 6,000 visitors. It was probably built by the Trieste Quinto Petronio Modesto , prosecutor Emperor Trajan.

Over the centuries, the theater was left under the houses that were built above. Considered lost, it was identified in 1814 and unearthed in 1938 during the demolition of this part of the old city. The statues and inscriptions found in the excavations are kept in the San Guisto Castle.

Nowadays Teatro Romano is still occasionally used for outdoor summer shows.

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Details

Founded: 100-0 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Croe (17 months ago)
Very interesting, but weird placement of the dumpsters for Aldi
pts pts (17 months ago)
Free to view. Ruins are not large, but show critical elements, like drain pipes, structural supports, the seats, etc. Not a long viewing. Of course, no Roman theater can exist without Cat guardians ( you have to look, but they are there)
Captain Arnie (18 months ago)
Nice to see and its a free piece of History:)
Jeremy Bossy (2 years ago)
Wonderful blast to the past. Place is very accessible to the public so no need to get a tour or ticket to view the place. In the heart of Trieste so it's definitely not out of the way to reach. Place looks to be fairly well preserved as to when it must've been used in the past. Would definitely recommend visiting whenever in Trieste
Sarah Lalor (2 years ago)
A fascinating sight with lots of information boards around including in English. It is a very well maintained site which understandably has restricted access so you can go in at set times but there is plenty to see from the outside. Well worth a visit.
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