Vallensbæk Church

Vallensbæk, Denmark

Vallensbæk church was built between 1150 and 1200. The tower was added in the 16th century. The altar was destroyed by fire in 2007.

The Romanesque style baptismal font dates from the beginning of the 13th century and is the oldest item in the church. 

The church in Vallensbæk Village dates back to the 1100s, built in the years 1150-1200. It is a typical village church, which originally consisted of cows and ships in Romanesque style built in chalk quarters. The tower has only come to later, in the 16th century, and is listed in the bedoque style. The church of Vallensbæk came to the Reformation in the King's possession, but in 1688, the Office of Ethics and Counselor Caspar Schiøler acquired the church. Later in 1755, he passed over to the owner of the estate, Hans Nicolai Nissen, and after his death, under the Nissen Foundation. Until the fire in 2007, you could still see the signature and monograms of NH Nissen and after his nephew, W. Pechüle, you in Vallensbæk 1801-45, on the altar's roof. The church was privately owned until the mid-1950s. Today the church is owned by the church at the church council. 

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ann Petersen (21 months ago)
Dejligt og meget centralt sted i Vallensbæk.
Susanne Marker (22 months ago)
Hyggelig kirke.
mikael nielsen (2 years ago)
Altid en fornøjelse at komme til marked på sognegården, det er et stort arbejde de frivillige udfører
Kim Jørgensen (2 years ago)
Stork over vallensbæk kirke
Nils Deichmann (4 years ago)
Dejlig livlig dåbsgudstjeneste, og medlevende præst. Flotte kalkmalerier i loftet.
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