Roman Pyramid

Vienne, France

The Roman Pyramid in Vienne is an emblematic building of the architectural heritage of the city together with the Roman Theatre. It is an unique remain of a Roman circus, where racing took place.

The pyramid was the central building of the Roman 'circus maximus'. The 25 meters high obelisk stood in the center of the sand track. Its location on an axial platform (Spina) was confirmed by excavations in the nineteenth and at beginning of twelfth century.

Copy of 'circus maximus' of Rome, the archaeologists believe that it could accommodate between fifteen thousand to twenty thousand spectators. The pyramid of Vienne was long called 'the needle' by the population. Popular legends are even say that here is the tomb of Pontius Pilate who, after being governor of Judea, died in exile in Vienne.

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Details

Founded: 100-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shay Seng (2 years ago)
Elegant hotel, gastronomic restaurant. The food was well executed, but felt a little old style French.
Tom Williams (2 years ago)
Amazing food. The stake was heavenly.
Joseph Gunselman (2 years ago)
A must dining experience the Rhone!
Michael Lee (3 years ago)
A real Michelin experience,great food, service and atmosphere. It is worthy of a trip from Lyon! Fixed menu from €67 to €173 with wine and coffee. 4 small appetizer accompanying appetizer. Small dishes with main courses----
R Johnson (3 years ago)
Fine dining that will not disappoint. Presentation first rate. Menu is seasonal - first day of autumn included lamb. Impeccable service. Wine list drawn from the cellar of the gods.
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