Roman Pyramid

Vienne, France

The Roman Pyramid in Vienne is an emblematic building of the architectural heritage of the city together with the Roman Theatre. It is an unique remain of a Roman circus, where racing took place.

The pyramid was the central building of the Roman 'circus maximus'. The 25 meters high obelisk stood in the center of the sand track. Its location on an axial platform (Spina) was confirmed by excavations in the nineteenth and at beginning of twelfth century.

Copy of 'circus maximus' of Rome, the archaeologists believe that it could accommodate between fifteen thousand to twenty thousand spectators. The pyramid of Vienne was long called 'the needle' by the population. Popular legends are even say that here is the tomb of Pontius Pilate who, after being governor of Judea, died in exile in Vienne.

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Details

Founded: 100-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martynas Barysas (14 months ago)
Lovely, cosy hotel, with modern interiors and very good service (including care about safety in these pandemic times).
Martynas Barysas (14 months ago)
Lovely, cosy hotel, with modern interiors and very good service (including care about safety in these pandemic times).
Roel Flokstra (15 months ago)
Excellent and a must visit
Roel Flokstra (15 months ago)
Excellent and a must visit
Jon Bowden (23 months ago)
Nice hotel. Great gastronomic dinner. Tepid shower.
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