Poppelsdorf Palace

Bonn, Germany

The design of a new structure to replace the old ruined castle of Poppelsdorf commenced in 1715 at the request of the owner, Joseph Clemens, Archbishop-Elector of Cologne, who engaged the French architect Robert de Cotte. Clemens wanted a maison de plaisance that would be near his remodeled Bonn Palace one-half mile to the north. There was to be a canal between the two, following the example of the Palace of Versailles and the Trianon de Marbre.

Work came to a halt after Clemens' death in 1723, but his nephew and heir, Archbishop of Cologne Clemens August, undertook a second campaign of construction in 1745–1746.

Under the Prussian rule, in 1818 the Palace and the nearby Park became part of the University of Bonn. In the same year the Park was converted to the Botanical Garden of Bonn, which today contains about 0.5 hectares of greenhouse area with eleven greenhouses and about 8.000 different plants.

In 1944 the Palace was heavily damaged by an Allied air attack. It has been rebuilt in a much simpler appearance from 1955 on.

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Address

Clemens-August-Weg, Bonn, Germany
See all sites in Bonn

Details

Founded: 1715-1746
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lark Sisterman (2 years ago)
Looks nice from the outside, unfortunately it was closed when we went there.
MD SABBIR-BIN HOSSAIN (2 years ago)
Nice place for spend time with friends and family and also for running.
MrRoelWouters (2 years ago)
The Poppelsdorf Palace is a beautiful palace that is mostly surrounded by beautiful gardens. You can visit the inner courtyard free of charge. Inside you can find the Mineralogical-Petrological Museum and the Institute for Zoology. Outside the gardens have been turned into botanical gardens for which you have to pay to visit them.
Kathy Newman (2 years ago)
Nice palace and surrounding gardens, nice for a stroll and picnic
Catherine Widmann (3 years ago)
200 year old Mineralogical Museum great for adults and kids! Hands-on exhibits and examples of how minerals are used in our daily lives were well received. Thank you! Next year 2018 look out for events celebrating its 200 year anniversary. The interiors are beautiful and the collection impressive.
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