Gimborn Castle is a former water castle located in the upper Leppe valley. It was pledged in 1273 from the county of Berg to the county of Mark, and became the Residenz in the county of Gimborn Neustadt of the House of Schwarzenberg in 1631. Since 1874 the castle has belonged to the Barons von Fürstenberg zu Gimborn.

Since 1969 the Castle has served as a conference site and meeting place for the International Police Association.

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Details

Founded: 1273
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Timo Catalano (19 months ago)
Das Bildungszentrum liegt sehr idyllisch und ruhig in einem Waldgebiet. Die Tagungsräume sind technisch modern und haben aufgrund der alten Bausubstanz einen eleganten Charme. Die Unterbringung, insbesondere im Schloss, ist beeindruckend. Die Zimmer sind sauber und sind zweckmäßig eingerichtet. Die Turmbar (Selbstbedienung) ist einen besuch wert und vermittelt einen Mittelalterflair. Die Mahlzeiten werden in einem Nebengebäude gereicht. Bei unserem Aufenthalt war das EG eine Baustelle. Vermutlich war auch die Küche geschlossen, denn das Essen war einfach nur schlecht. Ansonsten hat mir der Aufenthalt in Gimborn sehr gefallen.
Guido Karl (2 years ago)
Eine sehr schöne Tagungsstätte, sehr idyllisch gelegen, top Betreuung, inmitten der ruhigen Natur. Schön um dem Stadtalltag zu entfliehen.
Bee Nickman (2 years ago)
Im Rahmen eines Seminars die Anlage kennen und lieben gelernt. Das Schloss hat gute Tagungsmöglichkeiten, die Unterbringung erfolgt nicht nur dort sondern auch in anderen Liegenschaften... Essen in der gegenüberliegenden Gaststätte in Ordnung. Würde immer wieder gerne dort was lernen.
Konstantinos Papazoglou (3 years ago)
I lectured as an invited speaker at the training center of the International Police Association (IPA) located in IBZ Gimborn, Germany. Topic: " Violence against police officers and other government agency employees." Vibrant audience, participants asked amazing questions, and the German organizers did amazing job! Also, the food was delicious and the place was pristine and gorgeous.
wong Elvis (7 years ago)
Excellent Course
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