Marc Chagall Museum

Nice, France

The Musée Marc Chagall is dedicated to the work of painter Marc Chagall - essentially his works inspired by religion - located in Nice in the Alpes-Maritimes.

The museum was created during the lifetime of the artist and inaugurated in 1973. It houses the series of seventeen paintings illustrating the biblical message, painted by Chagall and offered to the French State in 1966. This series illustrates the books of Genesis, Exodus and the Song of Songs.

Chagall himself provided detailed instructions about the creation of the garden by Henri Fish, and decided the place of each of his works in the museum. The chronological order of the works was not followed. Chagall created the mosaic which overlooks the pond and the blue stained glasses that decorate the concert hall; he also wanted an annual exhibition to be held on a topic related to the spiritual and religious history of the world.

As the collection has grown, what was a museum illustrating the theme Biblical message has become a monographic museum dedicated to Chagall's works of religious and spiritual inspiration. In 1972, the artist gave the museum all the preparatory sketches of the Message Biblique as well as stained glass and sculptures, and in 1986, the museum acquired, in lieu of inheritance taxes, the complete drawings and gouaches painted to depict the Exodus and ten other paintings, which includes the triptych named Résistance, Résurrection, Libération. Other acquisitions complemented the museum's collections, which now has one of the largest collection of works by Marc Chagall.

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Details

Founded: 1973
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrei Bobu (3 months ago)
Not very big, but a very nice museum. The collection is quite rich, means that there are many paintings of Chagall, and not the worst ones. The exhibition is well arranged, the information on the paintings is useful and well written. Recommend the place to eat at the territory of the museum, good crêpes. Right now the museum is changing the exhibition, so only one room is available, but it is for free up to 9 (I think) October.
Zara Khan (3 months ago)
I love this place for obvious reasons! For the legend himself! The museum was found through renovations so all rooms weren’t open for exhibit but the room that was accessible was I credibly enlightening. Chagalls work is symbolic, vibrant and thought provoking!
A J (4 months ago)
I had heard of Chagall, but this dedicated museum helped me better understand his style and the intricacies of his works! There are profound biblical themes in these paintings. You can access the audio guide from your smart phone by QR codes by the main paintings. 10€ was expensive for this museum and it’s not part of the Nice Museum group pass, but it was worth coming. The audio guide and detailed explanations made the visit worthwhile. Thanks to this experience I can now recognize Chagall paintings in other museums. The visit can be done in under an hour since it’s a small museum
Diana Anette (5 months ago)
This is, quite possibly, my favourite art museum in the world. Chagall's artwork is overwhelming beautiful on its own, but the museum also provides the perfect setting for its exposition (one can feel Chagall's hand at every turn - it makes one wishes artists could always decide the shale of their own exhibitions). Perfect lighting, enough space to always view the works serenely... I can't recommend a visit enough!
Maria Komleva (5 months ago)
It was one of the best museum that I have visited for some reasons: 1. I like art by Mr Marc Chagall; 2. I like Nice; 3. The presentation of exposition was very nice, you can upload the bar-code from each poster of the picture and hear audio on your language regarding this picture. Great!
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