Château Saint-Jeannet

Saint-Jeannet, France

The Château Saint-Jeannet is a notable French castle located about 10km northwest of Nice. Tradition tells that the site was used as a fortress as early the 9th and 10th centuries. However, the earliest known construction on the château hill can only be dated to the 11th century. Written records of a château on the site date to the 13th century. Since that time, it has been effectively destroyed and rebuilt several times. The most recent renovation recovered evidence of the design of that earliest fort, and has attempted to echo it in the placement of the road, outer walls, and observatory tower.

Prior to major renovations completed in 2009, it was known as the Château de la Gaude, because it is situated in the village of La Gaude, just south of Saint-Jeannet proper.

Once the renovation was completed, all the feudal style of the castle was lost. These restorations were not intended to preserve the castle's authenticity but to erect a pseudo luxury hotel that today looks more like a Hollywood cardboard decoration than a feudal castle.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emmanuel Laubu (3 years ago)
Sympa.... Mais de loin.... Propriété privé !
pierre ruitort (3 years ago)
Très beau site
Nicolas GUY (4 years ago)
Une magnifique bâtisse malheureusement très peu ouvert aux visiteurs
Vivi Chambettaz (4 years ago)
Très beau Château les propriétaires sont Adorables et conviviale
Nick Coates (5 years ago)
Noisy again tonight, turn the music down unless its good
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