Avenches Castle

Avenches, Switzerland

Dating back to the 13th century, the castle of Avenches features a renovated Renaissance-style façade, one of the most beautiful testimonies of this type of architecture in Switzerland. Today, the castle accommodates offices, classrooms, a theatre, an art gallery and a library.

Located next door to the arenas, the castle of Avenches dominates the capital of Roman Switzerland. This public and historic building boasts an art gallery and a theatre, an exceptional setting where artists present their works throughout the year. Apart from these halls dedicated to the arts, the castle comprises offices, apartments, classrooms and a library.

The castle of Avenches owes its construction and emblematic keep to the bishops of Lausanne, who, as the town’s suzerains, built the building in the 13th century. The building was renovated in the 15th century and during the Bernese domination. The architects of that era spared the magnificent keep, extended the castle and added a remarkable façade, which is one of the most beautiful examples of Renaissance architecture in Switzerland.

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Trenčín Castle is relatively large renovated castle, towering on a steep limestone cliff directly above the city of Trenčín. It is a dominant feature not only of Trenčín, but also of the entire Považie region. The castle is a national monument.

History of the castle cliff dates back to the Roman Empire, what is proved by the inscription on the castle cliff proclaiming the victory of Roman legion against Germans in the year 179.

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