The Musée Rath is an art museum in Geneva, used exclusively for temporary exhibitions. It is the oldest purpose-built art museum in Switzerland.

The museum was built between 1824 and 1826 by the architect Samuel Vaucher on behalf of the Société des arts. It was partly paid for with funds that General Simon Rath (1766–1819) had bequeathed to his sisters, Jeanne-Françoise and Henriette Rath, for such a purpose; the remainder was paid by the state of Geneva. Vaucher designed the building as a temple of the muses, inspired by Ancient Greek temples.

At first the museum was used for both permanent and temporary exhibitions, as well as art teaching and as a cultural meeting place. By 1880 it had become too small for its collections. Since the opening of the larger Musée d'Art et d'Histoirein 1910, the Musée Rath has been devoted to temporary exhibitions of Swiss and international art, and archaeology.

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Details

Founded: 1824
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Balogun Sheindemi (10 months ago)
Lovely place
Maheshi KY (11 months ago)
An old castle like building with preserved glass paintings, glass art and porcelain work.
ATEF HASSEN (16 months ago)
Beautiful museum, a must see place.
Dario Brander (17 months ago)
A very nice museum with changing exhibits. It has been renovated a few years back and is quite modern on the inside. It’s conveniently sized and not overwhelming. Typically they do exhibits about one particular artist (eg. Hodler) or topic. There are free ipod audioguides in several languages and you can also download the app on your own phone. They also do descriptive and tactile tours for blind people. Which is nice... if you’re blind. Why not 5 stars? Well, it really depends on the exhibit that they have on!
Penny Portner (18 months ago)
Exhibit was fabulous! Definitely do the audio tour! Made it so much more worthwhile!
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