The Musée Rath is an art museum in Geneva, used exclusively for temporary exhibitions. It is the oldest purpose-built art museum in Switzerland.

The museum was built between 1824 and 1826 by the architect Samuel Vaucher on behalf of the Société des arts. It was partly paid for with funds that General Simon Rath (1766–1819) had bequeathed to his sisters, Jeanne-Françoise and Henriette Rath, for such a purpose; the remainder was paid by the state of Geneva. Vaucher designed the building as a temple of the muses, inspired by Ancient Greek temples.

At first the museum was used for both permanent and temporary exhibitions, as well as art teaching and as a cultural meeting place. By 1880 it had become too small for its collections. Since the opening of the larger Musée d'Art et d'Histoirein 1910, the Musée Rath has been devoted to temporary exhibitions of Swiss and international art, and archaeology.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1824
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Balogun Sheindemi (2 years ago)
Lovely place
Maheshi KY (3 years ago)
An old castle like building with preserved glass paintings, glass art and porcelain work.
ATEF HASSEN (3 years ago)
Beautiful museum, a must see place.
Dario Brander (3 years ago)
A very nice museum with changing exhibits. It has been renovated a few years back and is quite modern on the inside. It’s conveniently sized and not overwhelming. Typically they do exhibits about one particular artist (eg. Hodler) or topic. There are free ipod audioguides in several languages and you can also download the app on your own phone. They also do descriptive and tactile tours for blind people. Which is nice... if you’re blind. Why not 5 stars? Well, it really depends on the exhibit that they have on!
Penny Portner (3 years ago)
Exhibit was fabulous! Definitely do the audio tour! Made it so much more worthwhile!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.