Inchmurrin Castle Ruins

Inchmurrin, United Kingdom

At the Southwest tip of the Inchmurrin island are the ruins of the 14th century castle built by Duncan the Eighth Earl of Lennox. The castle is recorded as having been completed by 1393 and the Earls of Lennox took up residence in the 14th century when they moved from their castle in Balloch during the plague. The castle was composed of three rooms, outbuildings and a courtyard.

King Robert the I is believed to have been given refuge here by the Fifth Earl of Lennox after his defeat by the MacDougalls of Lorne. King Robert the I also established a deer park here in the 14th century.

Isabella, countess of Albany and the daughter of the Eighth earl of Lennox was exiled here after 1425 when her husband, father and two sons were all executed on the same day at Stirling by King James I. She lived at the castle for the rest of her life and died on the island in 1460 after which the castle was abandoned. It is recorded that Sir John Colquhoun of Luss was killed here in 1439 during a raid led by Lachlan MacLean.

King James the IV used the castle as a hunting lodge around 1506 as did King James the VI in later years.

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Inchmurrin, United Kingdom
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Details

Founded: 1393
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Y (12 months ago)
Lovely islands and one of my favourite islands
David Stransky (14 months ago)
One of my favourite islands. There's pub, food and beer, nice, mile long walkway and lovely twin beaches at the other (eastern) end. Call them if you need shuttle from mainland and order your table, you'd love it.
Dean Stewart (3 years ago)
Paradise
Gordon Woodward (5 years ago)
Lovely spot fantastic views
John Russell (5 years ago)
Fantastic place, 10 mins ferry trip for a smashing lunch,
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