Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti di Bergamo

Bergamo, Italy

The Accademia Carrara is an art gallery and an academy of fine arts in Bergamo. The origins of the art gallery lie with the Count Giacomo Carrara, a wealthy collector and patron of the arts, who left a generous legacy to the city of Bergamo at the end of the 18th century. After the Count's death, in 1796, his properties were managed by a nominated commissary until 1958, when the Comune di Bergamo took over direct supervision. In 1810, a new building in the neoclassical style was constructed, the project being undertaken by the architect Simone Elia, a pupil of Leopoldo Pollack.

The museum has continued to augment its collections both with purchases and donations. As of 2006, it possesses 1,800 paintings dating from the 15th to the 19th century, and by artists including Pisanello, Botticelli, Bellini, Carpaccio, Mantegna, Raphael, Moroni, Baschenis, Fra Galgario, Tiepolo, Canaletto and Piccio.

Besides paintings, there are drawings and prints, bronzes and sculptures, as well as collections of porcelain, furniture and medals.

In 1793, at the same time as the public opening of his gallery, the Count Giacomo Carrara desired that drawing and painting courses be initiated in the same place. The school, which was located in the same building as the art gallery until 1912, now has its own premises nearby. Since 1988, it has been an officially recognized Accademia di Belle Arti (Fine Arts Academy).

In 1991, the modern art gallery Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea (GAMEC) was opened on the opposite side of the road in a partially restored 14th-century monastery that had previously been used as a barracks. Presently, it has ten exhibition halls, on three floors. Since the purchase of the Gianfranco and Luigia Spajani collection in June 1999 the permanent collections have contained works by Italian and foreign artists of the 20th century.

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Details

Founded: 1810
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom E. Johansen (2 years ago)
The mastery and naivity in old pantings
Kri Zermas (2 years ago)
Highly recommended. The collection is precious and wonderful. Admission ticket a bit pricy but worth visiting!
Ali Vedat Dicleli (2 years ago)
Great collection of El Greco, Titan , Botticelli , Bellini , etc . Stunning building and cordial staff.
William Bloor (3 years ago)
It is definitely worth a visit, let me get that out of the way. But compared with the beautifully curated and installed contemporary gallery opposite this is a bit of a mess. The works fight for space overly cramped walls, the restoration seems too aggressive to the point of inauthenticity. I am of the preservation rather than recreation school of restoration, so this may not be a problem for some. The truth is that the collection is great, and worth a look. But the chaotic reception areas, terrible typography on the walls and the odd silhouettes on the windows combine to give a 'designed by committee' vibe to the space.
Nikolas Kar (3 years ago)
Appreciate it that it is a small city with this kind of high quality museum. However, would appreciate it further if the texts were more inspired and not just informational. Add a little background story details, or a humanistic curator's approach and you will inspire the public even more.
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