Brescia Old Cathedral

Brescia, Italy

The Duomo Vecchio or Old Cathedral (also called La Rotonda because of its round layout) is a rustic circular Romanesque co-cathedral standing next to the Duomo Nuovo (New Cathedral) of Brescia. It is one of the most important examples of Romanesque round church in Italy.

While some claims for an earlier construction exist, the earliest documents state the cathedral was built in the 11th century on the site of a prior church with a basilica layout. It has a circular shape that became rare after the Council of Trent.

In the 19th century, many additions to the original medieval building were removed. The entrance portal is one later addition remaining. It contains the medieval Crypt of San Filastrio, in honor of the beatified Brescian bishop.

Near the entrance, rests the sarcophagus of Bishop Berardo Maggi (1308) made of red marble. The Duomo Vecchio contains l'Assunta(1526) and St. Luke, St. Mark and the sleeping Elijah(1533 - 34) by Moretto da Brescia. It contains a Gathering Manna by Gerolamo Romanino and a Translation of the Bodies of Saints by Francesco Maffei.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

katherine downing (16 months ago)
Loved the city and this incredible treasure.
M Man Baradi (2 years ago)
Very charming old city
Christina (2 years ago)
It's a beautiful gothic monument
Sandeep Singh (3 years ago)
Excellent place to visit. Extremely Beautiful and Peaceful place.
Jara Lopez (3 years ago)
Beautiful , specially at nighttime! I would recommend to just stroll around the city , wandering and enjoying its sunset and why not , aperitivo! It was a pity that many places were closed and no people in the street because of the weather .. anyhow Brescia it’s worth the trip !
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