Brescia Old Cathedral

Brescia, Italy

The Duomo Vecchio or Old Cathedral (also called La Rotonda because of its round layout) is a rustic circular Romanesque co-cathedral standing next to the Duomo Nuovo (New Cathedral) of Brescia. It is one of the most important examples of Romanesque round church in Italy.

While some claims for an earlier construction exist, the earliest documents state the cathedral was built in the 11th century on the site of a prior church with a basilica layout. It has a circular shape that became rare after the Council of Trent.

In the 19th century, many additions to the original medieval building were removed. The entrance portal is one later addition remaining. It contains the medieval Crypt of San Filastrio, in honor of the beatified Brescian bishop.

Near the entrance, rests the sarcophagus of Bishop Berardo Maggi (1308) made of red marble. The Duomo Vecchio contains l'Assunta(1526) and St. Luke, St. Mark and the sleeping Elijah(1533 - 34) by Moretto da Brescia. It contains a Gathering Manna by Gerolamo Romanino and a Translation of the Bodies of Saints by Francesco Maffei.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jouni Tuomela (14 months ago)
Vacation in Italy. Good time to visit in Brescia old town. Love Italy!
Ognian Dimitrov (15 months ago)
Interesting round basilica. There's not much to look inside, but it looks very good outside.
Mariarosa Ori (17 months ago)
Very few cathedrals have a round shape... this is one of them. During Christmas season, a collection of nativity scenes made by locals is shown for free.
Ludovica Roselli (2 years ago)
Very nice Romanesque cathedral with unique works of art. Beware the opening times as they can be problematic for the average visitor without too much time to spare. The whole church has a permanent exhibition which mostly consists of panels with pictures and explanations on the history of the building. Notable are the crypt and the main chapel behind the high altar: it contains several beautiful pieces of both fresco and painting.
iliya pezeshki (3 years ago)
It’s antiquely beautiful and worth a visit, circle gathering place which is not something that you can see everywhere. Unique architecture.
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